Negative Effects Of Stalinism

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The term Stalinism is most commonly used to specify the political regime under Joseph Stalin. Stalinism therefore covers the policies, reforms and regulations implemented within the Stalinist period of 1929-53. The profound imprint of Stalinism could be seen in multiple facets of the Soviet society, including economy, agriculture, politics and culture, as the ultimate modifications to such areas allowed for Stalin to transition Russia towards the new goal of ‘socialism in one country’. The effects of Stalinism however proved devastating for the Russian populace as through the use of manipulation and terror, these goals were attempted and achieved. The introduction of industrialisation, collectivisation, the changes to cultural and educational…show more content…
The process of industrialisation through the introduction of a series of Five Year Plans (FYP) were successful in transforming Russia from a backward semi-developed nation to one which could match the West in industrial output. In 1928 the first FYP was introduced, this plan required heavy industry such as oil, steel and coal to almost triple in their output, and light industry would need to be doubled; this included clothes, shoes and furniture. And it would be necessary for electrical production to increase sixfold. They failed to meet this quota by the end of 1932, however a great increase in industrial production was achieved. The output of oil increased from 11.7 to 21.4 million tonnes, steel increased by 1.9 million tonnes and coal almost doubled from 35 to 64 million tonnes. The second FYP (1932-32) generated similar results, and by 1933, overall output levels were four times that of 1913. 1929 and 1938 saw production of gas and oil both rose by 130%, production of coal and iron ore rose by 230% each, steel by 267%, and electricity by 540%. These successes however were built on much sacrifice from the proletariat. The majority of production was of industrial goods, which allowed for investment to remain high, however there were very little…show more content…
From 1928, to 1938, religious activities and religion itself was discouraged. Religious promoters and leaders were imprisoned or sent to labour camps, and 40 000 Christian churches and 25 000 mosques were closed, or used for other purposes. Churches were looted, items of worth were sold and used to benefit the economy, and buy heavy industry to help in the collectivised farms. The reforms had a dreadful impact on the Soviet society as the Russian people had removed the basic human right of free thought and belief. Censorship of books and articles were intensified, and ‘social realism’ (glorified depiction of communist values, such as the emancipation of the proletariat, in a realistic manner) began to dominate artworks. Artists were forced to produce works that glorified the everyday worker who contributed to building a better society under Stalin. The reforms meant that if writers did not submit to these restrictions, their works would never published, and they forfeited their state paid wages, in some cases they could even be sent to labour camps. Cultural reforms also had a significant impact upon women and family. After the 1917 revolution women had been granted greater rights in marriage and of their own bodies, these rights made divorce and abortion easier. By 1934 the government became so
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