Negative Effects Of Cell Phone Addiction

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Cell phones are one of the most innovative inventions of our generation, with brand new devices every year that have more added features for our benefits. Cell phones allow us to communicate with our loved ones, and meet new people across the world. Many individuals feel that cell phones are affecting the way we interact with each other, and affecting our lives. Adler (2013), a news reporter and station manager, wrote an article that showed that cell phones are affecting the relationship between a parent and a child. It also shows that parents are missing important events in their child’s life because they are too consumed with their phones (Adler, 2013). In addition, cell phones raised awareness of many individuals who believe that teenagers…show more content…
Afolayan Titilope, an information and communication science lecturer, suggests that mobile phones have a negative effect on young adults, and it can cause behavioral changes. The author also suggests that cell phone addiction affects a person with “loneliness, egoism, self-independence, boredom, and involvement in major/minor accidents” (Titilope, 2014). Cell phone addiction is a form of an attachment to cell phones where a person cannot function without it, and it becomes a need more than a necessity. One form of cell phone addiction is excessive texting or calling constantly and the person would always want the phone to be beside them. Titilope concludes that cell phone usage can change an individual’s behavior at home and in public…show more content…
In a more recent study (Weller et al., 2013) shows that cell phone usage can affect someone 's perception while driving, whether they are teenagers or young adults. The authors, all psychologists and Ph.D., suggests that there is an association between cell phone attachment and driving. The authors collected data from random individuals to find out if there is an association between cell phones used while driving; it suggests that there is a great number of individuals who used their phones to talk, text, Facebook and web search while driving. The study also shows the difference in age and their attachment to their phones, and the number of people who report CPUWD-texting (Cell phone used while driving) (see Figure 2 and 3) (Weller et al., 2013). The respondents in figure 2 whose median age is 19 and 27 shows that there are more people reporting CPUWD-texting who has low risk perception while driving, compare to the people who has high risk perception (2013). In contrast, figure 3 shows that there are more people reporting CPUWD-texting who has high perceive attachment to cell phones, compare to the people who has low perceived attachments (2013). The figures showed us that there are at least over 30% of people who have high perceive attachment to their cell phones that are reporting to CPUWD-texting
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