Natasha Baker And Knollenberg's Views Of Colorblind Racism In Schools

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While the article by Kim Russell points out the overt racism that Senator Knollenberg stated in his comments about African-American’s economic disadvantages and disparaged school districts, it engages in covert racism by participating in colorblind racial practices. Both Natasha Baker and Knollenberg used frames of colorblind racism: Naturalization, Minimization of Racism, and Abstract Liberalism. Color-blind racism works covertly through social institutions that uphold racial ideology, which assigns value to an individual or group based on race, this often means that people of color are devalued in society. Racial ideology can be viewed as a sub-set of dominate ideologies, ideas, values and norms, which are created by those who have power…show more content…
In the new racial ideology, that created this new form of racism as covert, it is common for history to be used as a comparison of “true racism” to issues that are happening today; but it is rare that the connection to history is used to understand that the issues of modern society. Baker and Knollenberg, engage in this type of rhetoric in the article. In his recorded meeting Knollenberg is caught saying “that’s just, it is what it is,” in reference to the differences between white and POC citizens. This idea that the only difference between these groups of people is the color of their skin is to suggest that it is also natural for structural and social inequalities between these groups as well. That suggestion, while a bit of a normative argument, has been backed up by Bonilla-Silva in his interviews for racism without racists (2014). Naturalization, in this case, discounts the history of enslavement and oppression of people of…show more content…
That is exactly the assumption Baker wanted listeners to believe when she stated “ There was no suggestion that the students’ academic performance was caused by their economic status or their race or ethnicity” going on to say that “all children are capable of high academic performance in a high performing school” (Russell, 2015). However, this idea of unlimited achievement, with an “if you put your mind to it” mentality is abstract liberalism; equal opportunity to all (Bonilla-Silva, 2014). Baker’s assertion “in a high performing school” has a lot of implications for equal opportunity. She is assuming that all districts regardless of population can provide the exact same educational standards as other schools. However, as their statistics point out, their schools are populated by low-socioeconomic students. This directly relates to the type of populations that live in the district. Because schools are funded by the property taxes of a district it would stand that the taxes would be low to match the incomes of the area, in which case there would be less funding for the schools. Kozol, illustrates these differences in Savage Inequalities (1991). Both Kozol and Bonilla-Silva highlight that often times these low-income areas are populated by POC residents, which is supported by
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