My Philosophy of Classroom Management

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Abstract My classroom management philosophy is a constant work in progress, but based off of personal experiences and major management theorists I have developed a basic philosophy to guide me through student teaching and the early years as a teacher. The core principles of my philosophy are rooted in establishing a classroom community and mutual respect between students and the teacher. The following essay outlines the theorists that have impacted my philosophy as well as ways I plan to implement my management philosophy. The foundation of an effective classroom is a strong, supportive classroom management plan. The first hurdle many new teachers have to overcome is the ability to maintain control of the classroom they are teaching. As I begin to develop my own management philosophy, I turn towards management theorists to develop a plan that models an effective management style while also reflecting my own personality. Rooted in my fundamental beliefs about students, that all students can learn, a classroom is a community, and mutual student/teacher respect is invaluable, I have begun to develop a unique classroom management philosophy. My philosophy reflects the theorists Rosemary and Harry Wong, William Glasser, Alfie Kohn, and Fred Jones. As I start my career as an educator I will turn to the studies of these theorists to continue to craft a personal management plan. The management of a classroom should first and foremost reflect the personality of the teacher that leads it. I am not a stern disciplinarian, nor am I a person who is willing to be walked all over. My management philosophy will reflect who I am. My classroom will be built on a mutual respect between th... ... middle of paper ... ...ing my room giving minimal time for student misbehavior. By meeting the basic needs of my students mutual respect will develop and a learning community will be created within my classroom. Positive behavior will be maintained through educational incentives and hierarchal, tiered discipline plan. References Bartel, V. B. (2005). Learning communities: beliefs embedded in content-based rituals. Early Childhood Education Journal, 33(3), 151-154. Charles, C.M.. Building classroom discipline. Boston: Pearson Education, 2010. Print Malmgren, K. W., Trezek, B. J., & Paul, P. V. (2005). Models of classroom management as applied to the secondary classroom. Clearing House, 79(1), 36-39. Sayeski, K. L., & Brown, M. R. (2011). Developing a classroom management plan using a tiered approach. Teaching Exceptional Children, 44(1), 8-17.

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