My Dangerous Desires Analysis

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Loneliness and Its Opposite, My Dangerous Desires and Beggars and Choosers collectively address gender, sex, sexuality, race, class, and bodily capacity. Loneliness and Its Opposite examines the ethics of disabled persons fulfilling their erotic desires. My Dangerous Desires discusses growing up queer, in a lower class biracial familyl. Lastly, Beggars and Choosers challenges how race, gender, and class can impact one’s reproductive choice. Each category of these books define the value of a body, and unfortunatley, in today’s world, some bodies hold a higher value than others. In “Loneliness And Its Opposite,” authors Kulick and Rydstrom observe how Denmark and Sweden, similar states in regards to welfare and attitudes, differ greatly in dealing…show more content…
Society must realize the “collective obligation and responsibility to treat people with disabilities not as recipients of charity and goodwill, not as objects of compassion, but as the primary subjects of justice” (Kuick 292). Every individual deserves the opportunity to be sexually active, regardless of his or her physical or mental abilities. In My Dangerous Desires, Amber Hollibaugh addresses how sexual liberation cannot be separated from race, class and sexuality. Hollibaugh was raised in a biracial, working class family. She grew up trying to find a place in the world for her mixed race, poor, female, femme, and lesbian self. However, as Hollibaugh’s knowledge of herself and society grew, it became evident that her quest for sexual liberation can not be separated from her economic and class struggles. Amber Hollibaugh is the daughter of an Irish mother and a Roma father. Amber’s mother grew up in a white, Irish working class family, while her father grew up being harassed and branded by the by KKK (Hollibaugh 28). These tragedies made Hollibaughs very cognizant of race, as did having light skinned and blonde hair in a biracial family. While these difference were never made salient, they were evident everyday of Amber’s…show more content…
Hollibaugh also struggled to find a self-identity where social norms prescribed that race, class and sexuality were distinctly independent. However, Hollibaugh’s story demonstrates that sexual liberation cannot be isolated from the struggles of economic and racial injustice. In Beggars and Choosers, Rickie Solinger discusses the era of “choice.” He analyzes how reproductive choices of poor women, especially those of color, were strikingly disimilar to the choices of middle class, white women. Solinger’s illustrations emplify how society should not base reproductive rights on class and
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