Motives Behind the Moors' Murders Ian Brady and Myra Hindley

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What conclusions do these arguments lead to? Was Brady’s childhood an adequate factor? I found that Garavelli and Stanford’s investigation were the best sources. I based this judgement on reliability and the context of these sources. Although, Harrison provides a non-judgemental approach; his investigation was relatively new. His investigation does not have the benefit of hindsight, therefore he was not able to use a greater range of evidence to strengthen his argument. Whereas, Garavelli and Stanford had decades to improve their analyses with new evidence that came to light. Brady was brought to trial once again during the time that Garavelli and Stanford’s investigations were produced. How is this relevant to his childhood? It is relevant because the knowledge of psychology have advanced that enabled Garavelli and Stanford to judge properly, whether Brady’s isolated childhood was a prominent factor. Whilst, Harrison did not have that luxury. His work was produced when knowledge of psychology were limited, something he had admitted. There was an “inadequate state of psychiatric knowledge” . Was Brady always psychopathic? It was more difficult to evaluate the sources that judged whether Ian Brady was schizophrenic because all sources appear that this may be the case. Nevertheless, I was impressed by Harrison’s in-depth detail. It is often that a criminal may suffer from a mental health illness; it explains their behavioural patterns. Harrison does not assume that Brady was schizophrenic immediately, instead he leads into this by exploring aspects of life that may have been the slow progression into schizophrenia. Although, Harrison provided incredible detail; he is not a psychologist. Therefore, his analysis lacks specialis... ... middle of paper ... ...an impact on his motivations? Myra Hindley was a complicated person to evaluate, as there is little explicit evidence to presuppose that this transformation was inevitable. However, Harrison’s “Folie a Deux” argument is the strongest. I cannot deny that the introduction to destructive interests, such as “Anti-Semitic literature” will have played a powerful part. Nevertheless, it seems that all this may have been elements of “Folie a Deux”. Though, this section has been focused on Hindley, it exhibits how vital Hindley’s transformation had been for Brady’s nature. Previously, I had claimed that Stanford’s conclusion about their “us-against-the-world paranoia” was too simplistic…the “Folie a Deux” argument gives good grounds why this paranoia may have developed. The psychiatric syndrome “Folie a Deux” may have been a fundamental fragment in Brady’s criminal nature

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