Most Common Jobs in the 16th century

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“In many cases a person’s clothing revealed his occupation” (Emerson, 186). Which means that the clothes you wear are associated with the job you have. Clothes weren’t only used to show a person’s job, “clothing was also used to distinguish persons who were considered inferior” (Emerson, 186). Jobs in the sixteenth century, considering they did not have modern technology and knowledge, were different than they are today. Depending on your occupation that would decide your income, rank in society, how old you are before you could start working, and your necessity to society. Servants were a common job in the sixteenth century. Organized crime such a prostitution was big during the sixteenth century. Midwifery was essential in the sixteenth century because midwives helped deliver babies, they would be the main person to attend birth. In the sixteenth century many mining districts increased dramatically, (Mining and Metallurgy, 157). Important jobs of the sixteenth century included servants, prostitutes, midwives, miners, and accountants. Servants took up a lot of jobs during the sixteenth century. “In many European cities female servants constituted as twelve percent of the population” (Servants, 453). Twelve percent of the population may seem like very little, but it’s really a lot, and that’s only the female servants. “Women servants were employed in less public tasks behind the scenes, helping in the kitchen and cleaning the bed chambers” (Servants, 453). Women servants were often used for helping in the kitchen and cleaning bed chambers. “Although girls as young as seven or eight and unmarried women formed the majority of servants, it was male servants who gave status to a house hold” (Servants, 453) Male servants were used fo... ... middle of paper ... ...: Writer’s Digest Books, 1996. Print. Grendler, Paul F. et al. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance, Volume One: Abrabanel-Civility. New York, New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1999. Print. Grendler, Paul F. et al. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance, Volume Two: Class Furio-Ceriol. New York, New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1999. Print. Grendler, Paul F. et al. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance, Volume Four: Machiavelli-Petrarchism. New York, New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1999. Print. Grendler, Paul F. et al. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance, Volume Five: Peucer-Sforza. New York, New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1999. Print. Grendler, Paul F. et al. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance, Volume Six: Shakespeare-Zwingli. New York, New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1999. Print. Planes, Alex. “The 5 Best Jobs in America.” The Motley Fool. 27 April, 2013. Web. 12 March, 2014

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