Morality In The Tell Tale Heart

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“Humanity, a balance of good and evil” "The Tell-Tale Heart" is Poe 's short story that was published in the mid of 19th century around 1840’s. The author Edgar Allan Poe was a favorite American poet, author, literary critic, and editor. An unidentified narrator, who attempts to prove to the reader of his sanity, as he describes a murder he committed, tells the story. In real life, we encounter objects or events that conjure up memories of experience, either good or bad. Apparently, the latter often deprive us our joy or happy life and the effects of the bad, evil, or painful memories become paramount if the experience is regular. Human beings value happiness, and we all work to live a pleasant life in the end. Thus, eliminating the scenarios…show more content…
Guilty people often get consumed by their conscience and somehow confess. The story involves an unnamed narrator who starts the story by addressing the reader and claims his sanity; by explaining that he is oversensitive and nervous but not mad. In addition, he offers his tranquility in the entire narration as a proof that he is sane. Furthermore, he explains how he could not stand the sight of a particular old man 's filmy and pale eyes. The narrator claims that although the old man never desired his money and had never wronged him; his eyes that conjure the vulture 's, made him decide to get rid of the old man 's eyes so that he could never have to see it. The narrator murders the old man at his room at night. Thereafter, policemen respond to the call of a neighbor who suspects a foul play at the old man’s place. The narrator invites the three police officers and guides them throughout the house as he tries to prove his innocence and make the police officers unsuspicious. Nonetheless, guilt eats him and he feels “must scream or die,” he finally cries the utter truth, informing the policemen to get rid of the floorboards and expose the beating of the old man’s…show more content…
The author heightens the murderer 's obsession with unadorned and distinct entities by stripping the story of excess detail; the heartbeat, his claim to sanity, and the old man 's eyes. The narrative content in "The Tell-Tale Heart" is a result of Poe 's pointed language and economical style. Moreover, this association of form and content truly demonstrate paranoia. Poe himself is complicit, similar to the beating heart, in the plot to capture the narrator’s evil game
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