Moral Theory Of Immanuel Kant

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18th-century philosopher Immanuel Kant came into the world in 1724, at the East Prussian city of Königsberg, in what is now Germany (Melvin). He first studied and subsequently worked at the regional university, up until three years prior to his death; and, interestingly, Kant never once journeyed beyond fifty miles from his hometown. He was a scientist as well as a philosopher, functioning in many capacities; encompassing anthropology, astrophysics, geography, and mathematics. He furthermore penned numerous “dense, difficult-to-read but highly influential texts regarding metaphysics, meta- and practical morality, science, history and politics” (Melvin). Moreover, Kant was the first documented academic to submit that part of the faint nebulae…show more content…
These writings establish the underpinning for Kant’s specific moral philosophy, generally centering on morality and action. The moral theory shaped by Kant is a manner of deontology. Deontology is a term which derives from the Greek name deon, connoting duty. The theory of deontology asserts that “we are morally obliged to act in accordance with a certain set of principles/rules regardless of the outcome” (Melvin). Deontological theories, or theories of duty, have been present in the world of business for hundreds of years; however the form of deontology generating the greatest aggregate of influence has proven to be the moral theory advanced by Immanuel Kant in 1788. In short, Deontological theories maintain that “some acts are always wrong - even if they achieve morally admirable ends” (Melvin). Furthermore, an act, in the sphere of deontology, is, invariably, to be weighed dispassionate of its consequence. This would be due to the fact that deontologists do not parallel the right with the…show more content…
Kant’s moral theory is grounded on his premise of the human being having the distinctive aptitude for rationality. Kant states that “no other animal possesses such a propensity for reasoned thought and action, and it is exactly this ability which obliges us to act according to the moral law/duty” (Melvin). His moral theory underscores the notion of an individual “acting in accordance with and for the sake of duty” (Melvin). Kant held that that inclinations, emotions and consequences ought to play no function in moral action; calling for the impetuses for action to be centered on
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