Metropolis 1984 Analysis

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“Technology facilitates dictatorship” To what extent does your comparative study of the intertextual perspectives of Metropolis and Nineteen Eighty-Four reflect this statement? An intertextual exploration of Fritz Lang’s silent film Metropolis (1927) and George Orwell’s satirical novel Nineteen Eight Four [1984] (1948) have elucidated the ubiquitous concerns regarding the dangers associated with technology and its role in the facilitation of a dictatorship. However, influenced by the composer’s milieu, the degree to which this concept is explored differs in both texts. Although both texts underpin the notion that technology causes the monopolization of power through dehumanizing individuals, Lang portrays both ends of the spectrum due to the…show more content…
This notion is conveyed to an extensive degree in Metropolis through the machinery. Lang articulates his concern with the growing popularity of capitalist values during the 1920s through the debasing effects of technology on the workers. The dehumanization of the proletariat is witnessed in the wide shot of Georgy’s at this clock machine. His robotic body language and imitation clock machine suggests that he is an appendage of the machine, placing him as an integral component of technology which further elucidates the stripping away of his identity. In addition, the long shot of the factory emphasizes the size disparity between the great machines and the workers. Not only does this illustrate the identical costuming and conformity of the workers but it also operates as a microcosm for a society which places much gravity on the industrialist and capitalist value of technology in which is reflective of Lang’s society during the onset of the industrial revolution. Moreover, the juxtaposition between Fredersen’s spacious office and the worker’s claustrophobic smoke-filled factory exemplifies how the dehumanization of the workers have benefited the elite class and allowed Fredersen to continue his oppressive…show more content…
This subdues any ideas against the party thus empowering the Party. The omnipresence of technology is observed in metaphor of a telescreen as a “never-sleeping ear” illustrating the overwhelming surveillance and scrutiny which is again underscored through Orwell’s use of repetition in “every sound you made was overheard…every movement scrutinized”. This presents technology as a political instrument employed to repress the any expression of ideas that oppose the Party’s thus amplifying the Party’s control. This is analogous with the USSR’s campaign “The Great Purge” whereby widespread surveillance was implemented to expose anti-Soviet elements. The anxious tone in Winston’s internal monologue “you could not control the beating of your heart, and the telescreen was quite delicate enough to pick it up” reveals the paranoia that surveillance evoked. This mimics the paranoid and fearful atmosphere of society due to the psychological warfare of the Cold War as tensions grew between Russia and America. Whilst Lang’s more optimistic view on technology as a result of the “Golden Ages of Weimar”, Orwell’s pessimistic approach embodies that of his society as a result of witnessing the brutality of Stalinism and the Cold
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