Medusa Is A Monster Archetypal Image

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Slithering serpents protruding from the skull of a yellow fanged, corpse like figure with, “looks that could kill.” When these words are heard, the mythological being Medusa is among one of the first things that comes to mind. Throughout the ages Medusa's story has been passed down from generation to generation and spread through means of media and literature. In the poem, “Medusa”, by Carol Ann Duffy, the author depicts a woman undergoing changes due to her uneasiness for her lovers wavering loyalty. The character, or speaker, has a suspicion that her lover, whom she holds close, has betrayed her. The woman represents a subsequent change in one's state portraying a monster, victim, or even a villainous figure as an effect that fears establish consequent to one's well being and state of mind from betrayal resulting in jealousy. In the poem, Duffy describes an overall monster archetypal figure to further reveal that, one's own thoughts and actions may turn them into their worst fears. In the poem, Duffy writes, “I stared in the mirror. Love gone bad showed me a Gorgon.” In ancient Greek times Gorgons were, “monsters” identified by their corpse like appearance and ability to turn their onlookers into stone with a single glance. As any rational person would know, nobody wants to love a monster. The character that is changing is seeing herself as a monster and is furthermore inferring that her lover won’t feel the same love for her because of her appearance and actions that relate to that of which is a monster. Much like the humanity of current times, the absence of love is a common source for monstrous actions. Later in the poem, the character claims, “So better by far for me if you were stone.” The characters statement continues to ... ... middle of paper ... ...statement, the character is trying to intentionally kill someone. Since Her lover betrayed her she wishes to kill him. Usually villains in the real world accommodate their killings (if a killer) to certain targets. Just as similar, the character has targeted her ex lover because he betrayed her. Throughout the poem Duffy uses contributions of archetypes to prove that the woman represents a subsequent change in one's state portraying a monster, victim, or even a villainous figure as an effect that fears establish consequent to one's well being and state of mind from betrayal resulting in jealousy. The archetypal figures revealed in the poem through the characters actions and language also contribute to a much larger meaning. That of which being that even in today's society, one's own actions and words can reveal the true monster, victim, or villain within themselves.

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