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Meditation

explanatory Essay
4152 words
4152 words
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Meditation is an age-old practice that has renewed itself in many different cultures and times. Despite its age, however, there remains a mystery and some ambiguity as to what it is, or even how one performs it. The practice and tradition of meditation dates back thousands of years having appeared in many eastern traditions. Meditation’s ancient roots cloud its origins from being attributed to a sole inventor or religion, though Bon, Hindu, Shinto, Dao, and later, Buddhism are responsible for its development. Its practice has permeated almost all major world religions, but under different names. It has become a practice without borders, influencing millions with its tranquil and healing effects.

Western medicine has recently discovered the powerful affects of meditation, by allowing doctors to treat the body and the mind. In reality, the mind is a very misunderstood and unexplored region of the human existence. Modern science knows more about the composition of the earth than it does about the mechanics of the human brain. Yet, meditation thwarts all notions of modern medicine with its shocking ability to to take obscure visualizations and create physical responses in the body. Mahayana Buddhism, found mainly in the autonomous region of Tibet, has become the main reference and standard for meditation practices in the west. Tibetans have used meditation for centuries as treatment for illness, and now, modern medicine of the western world is just beginning to reap the benefits of this unique and unconventional treatment for a variety of physical and mental ailments. Once a practice reserved strictly for Buddhist monks, meditation has become a worldwide phenomenon. Simply enter “Buddhist meditation” into the any Inter...

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...ay 2015.

https://www.sbp-journal.com/index.php/sbp/article/view/390

Michalon, Max. “Selflessness in the Service of the Ego,” American Journal of Psychotherapy. Vol.55, No.2, 2001. Web. 21 May 2015.

http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/4765470/selflessness-service-ego-contributions-limitations-dangers-buddhist-psychology-western-psychology

Tacon, Anna. “Meditation as a Complementary Therapy in Cancer,” Family and Community Health. Vol. 26, Issue 1. pp63-73, January – March, 2003. Web. 18 May 2015.

http://www.researchgate.net/publication/10712485_Meditation_as_a_complementary_therapy_in_cancer

Terrence, Clifford. Diamo Healing: The Buddhist Medicine and Medical Psychiatry of Tibet. Motilal Banarsidass. 2003.

Thera, Nyanaponika. Translated by Roberts, Peter. The Heart of Buddhist Meditation. Weiser Books; Revised edition, July 1, 2014.

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that meditation is an age-old practice that has renewed itself in many different cultures and times. its ancient roots cloud its origins from being attributed to a sole inventor or religion.
  • Explains that meditation thwarts all notions of modern medicine with its shocking ability to take obscure visualizations and create physical responses in the body.
  • Describes meditation as the practice of bringing the mind home to awaken in us the sky-like nature of mind and introduce us to that which we really are, our unchanging pure awareness.
  • Explains that the posture assumed during meditation resembles the crossed leg position of the buddha. sitting tall with a straight spine opens the body's channels with the mind.
  • Explains that tibetan medicine is a 2,500-year-old tradition that incorporates the practice of meditation when treating physical or mental illnesses.
  • Explains that meditation's indisputable positive effects for the eastern cultures have made some western doctors extremely curious about it.
  • Explains benson's fascinating case studies of buddhist monks practicing an advanced form of meditation called tum-mo.
  • Explains how benson and his team of researchers observed three buddhist monks in the himalayan mountains at an altitude of 1,800-2,800m.
  • Explains that modern science knows more about the composition of the earth than the functions and workings of human mind.
  • Explains that cancer and aids are a worldwide epidemic and that meditation can help reduce pain and improve the quality of t-cells.
  • Explains the benefits of meditation when treating cancer and aids, and the emotional and psychological influences that are the most fascinating. meditation has reached a new modernization by being applied to psychological therapy.
  • Explains how therapists aid patients through the struggles of love because they are uncomfortable with their own sense of emptiness and can't be open with another person.
  • Analyzes begley, s.s., "tibetan medicine: a transcultural nursing experience," j holist nurs. vol. 12 no.3, september 1994.
  • Explains that "evidence builds that meditation strengthens the brain." university of california - los angeles.
  • Analyzes richard boerstler's "author’s commentary: a holistic and meditative approach to the dying process." journal of personal and interpersonal loss.
  • Describes de silva, padmal's "buddhist psychology: a review of theory and practice." current psychology.
  • Explains dreyfus, georges, the sound of two hands clapping, university of california press, berkley, ca, 2003.
  • Opines that la torre, mary anne, "enhancing therapeutic presence," perspectives in psychiatric care.
  • Explains lodro, geshe gedun, and hopkins, jeffrey. calm abiding and special insight. snow lion publication ithaca, ny, 1998.
  • Explains meissner, john, and pirot, michael, "unbiasing the brain: the effects of meditation upon the cerebral hemispheres," social behavior and personality, vol. 11, issue 1.
  • Opines that michalon, max, "selflessness in the service of the ego," american journal of psychotherapy, vol.55, no.2, 2001.
  • Analyzes tacon, anna, "meditation as a complementary therapy in cancer," family and community health, vol. 26, issue 1.
  • Explains that the eyes should be closed in the dark or open in light, and the mouth should not be fully open or closed with a separation between the upper and lower teeth.
  • Opines that meditation will revolutionize the medical world as a treatment that requires no health insurance, no prescriptions, and no medically trained doctors.
  • Explains how tibetan spiritual practices bring peace of mind to the dying. one popularized ancient practice is phowa, meaning transference of conscience.
  • Explains that tonglen is a practice similar to the phowa, where one attempts to take on the emotional sufferings of another.
  • Describes terrence, clifford, thera, nyanaponika, and roberts, peter. the heart of buddhist meditation.
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