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Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

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Humanistic psychologist Abraham Maslow (1908-1970) developed a model that represents the motivational needs of humans. In this model, Hierarchy of Needs (1943), Maslow conceptualizes that human needs are met in five steps that begin with the basic physiological need (those of hunger, thirst, avoidance of pain, procreation, elimination). He then goes on to say that we may then become motivated to meet the needs for safety (of self, home, and those we love or care for), for love and belongingness (emotional bonds for intimacy, friendships, and social connections), to feel esteemed (the need for achievement, respect prestige, status, and/or approval) (Nevid, 2013). Maslow's hierarchy ends with the highest need, that of self-actualization. He feels that only after we meet the lower needs, can we begin to move up each step until we reach the fulfillment of human potential at the stage of self-actualization.
The lowest need in Maslow's hierarchy is that of the basic needs those, which ensure human physical survival. Such needs are of oxygen, water, food, shelter and sleep. These needs, which are essential to human life, we must meet in order to achieve the motivation necessary to reach the next goal in Maslow's hierarchy. Say for example, you are hungry. The need to satisfy that hunger takes precedence over the next need in the hierarchy, the need for safety. You will first seek food, when found is when you will begin to look for a safe place in which to eat.
Upon meeting the most basic of needs, we are able to focus on those of safety, which come forth to protect us, our families and friends, and our property. According to Maslow (1943), this need is also of "an organized world rather than an unorganized or unstructured one." (p. 377)...

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...s of self-actualization began and so here I am, a learner, learning more every day.

Works Cited

Maslow, A. (1943). A theory of human motivation. Psychological Review, 50(4), 370-396. Retrieved January 15, 2014, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0054346
Nevid. (2013). Psychology: Concepts and Applications(4th). Cengage Learning. Retrieved November 11, 2013, from http://euo.coursesmart.com/9991133471844
Maslow, A. (1943). A theory of human motivation. Psychological Review, 50(4), p.p.377. Retrieved January 15, 2014, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0054346
Maslow, A. (1943). A theory of human motivation. Psychological Review, 50(4), p.p. 308. Retrieved January 15, 2014, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0054346
Maslow, A. (1943). A theory of human motivation. Psychological Review, 50(4), p.p. 381-382. Retrieved January 15, 2014, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0054346
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