Masculinity In Sho Nuff

1299 Words6 Pages
Similar to Shaft, Sho’Nuff, also known as “Shogun of Harlem” is another perfect representation of a stereotypical black male. He is initially introduced when he storms into the New York City movie theatre, wearing leopard skin that reveals his muscular chest, shoulder pads to broaden his build, big hair to intensify his face, and shades to create a badass appearance. When Sho’Nuff rhetorically asks, “Am I the meanest, Am I the prettiest, Am I the baddest mofo, Well who am I…?”, all while his gang shouts out his name, he wants the audience around him to recognize him as the supreme master and that he is of higher power. Thinking that others believe Leroy is tougher than him, he proceeds to approach him saying “I am sick and tired of hearing…show more content…
The Yi brothers are dancing to a massive boom box, playing hip-hop music outside the Sum Dum Goy fortune cookie factory, while all three are dressed in clothing not typical of a traditional Chinese man. The Yi brothers are assertive towards Leroy, using slang words and bad mouthing him, “Ain’t no masters here, dude. Ain’ no slaves, either.” (49:18) When Leroy makes his second attempt with the Yi brothers, two different stereotypes arise, where Leroy “acts black” and the Yi brothers speak Chinese. Leroy impersonates his little brother, reiterating the lines “Hey, my man, what it look like?” in various manly tones to disguise his identity. The brothers do not fall for this, but instead use Leroy’s blackness to act more like their culture. In Butler-Sweets article, he writes, “When asked what "acting white" or "acting black" meant, informants spoke of cultural characteristics. In terms of specific cultural indicators, respondents believed that "acting white" and "acting black" differed in terms of style of dress, music preferences, and manner of speech. When pressed for further description, acting black reflected a hip-hop or urban style of dress which was typically more baggy, listening to rap and hip-hop music by black artists, and speaking in slang. Informants from all three groups understood these racialized…show more content…
Bazin argues, “If the plastic arts were put under psychoanalysis, the practice of embalming the dead might turn out to be a fundamental factor in their creation. The process might reveal that at the origin of painting and sculpture there lies a mummy complex. The religion of ancient Egypt, aimed against death, saw survival as depending on the continued existence of the corporeal body. Thus, by providing a defense against the passage of time it satisfied a basic psychological need in man, for death is but the victory of time.” (Bazin, P.9) The message that Bazin is trying to display is that many times, films contain messages and images that exist to become an eternal legacy. These images are preserved, so that the reproduction could be as successful as the original. This relates to the blaxploitation films of both Shaft and The Last Dragon. According to Bazin, plastic art relates to the quest for immortality and the avoidance of death on some level. Leroy’s was on a quest for the final level because he believed that it would help make him stronger and make him complete. It instead revealed that he was searching for his cultural identity, which was discovered when he finally glowed. Based on Bazin, the Black masculinity existing in both these films are meant to show cultural importance and remain in developing
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