Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Mary Shelley magnificently recounts the story of a desperate creator and his despicable creation in her novel entitled Frankenstein. Set in eighteenth century Europe, it holds a sinister yet meaningful message regarding desire for love and acceptance. Through the narration of a young man traveling toward the North Pole, the author introduces the protagonist: a scientist named Victor Frankenstein who finds himself at the northern tip of the earth. Frankenstein has used his scientific knowledge to create a living being, however his plans derailed as his experiment took an unexpected course. The product is a mysterious monster that has roamed free since his creation and is currently living in the North Pole. As Victor searches for the creature, he tells his tale to the traveling man, Robert Walton, in an attempt to dissuade him from the trap of following rash desires. Victor can see that Walton was a man obsessed with a goal, like he was, and wishes to help him curb his impulses that could lead to disastrous results. Shelley writes within accordance to the Romantic Period in which she wrote, for she incorporates countless aspects of nature into her writing. Nature constantly and considerably affects the shifting moods of the protagonist during his youth, research, recuperation, return to Switzerland, and final pursuit of the beast. In fact, the natural environment that surrounds Victor Frankenstein closely mirrors the mental confusion and conflict that he experiences throughout his adventures. The connection drawn between nature and Victor’s mind becomes evident early on during the young man’s childhood, during which time he is generally content. Frankenstein describes his early childhood in the warm climate of Italy at the L... ... middle of paper ... ...with vengeance (155). With the countless forces of nature that mirror his mental struggle, this is where his story meets that of his listener, Robert Walton. Frankenstein warns Walton to never fall victim to desires for discovery that are too great. Nature constantly and considerably has affected the shifting moods of the protagonist during his youth, research, recuperation, return to Switzerland, and final search for the monster. The natural environment that surrounds Victor Frankenstein has closely mirrored the mental confusion and conflict that he has experienced throughout his adventures. Overall, his story and the details of his natural environment come together to demonstrate the heartbreaking consequences that can come about from the obsessive search for power and discovery. Works Cited Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Boston: Cornhill Pub., 1922. Print.

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