Mary Magdalene Analysis

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Soon after Jesus’ crucifixion, Mary Magdalene weeps for the loss of her Lord. Seated outside of a tomb, Mary Magdalene cries because she does not know where Jesus’ body has been taken. Jesus is no longer in the tomb and instead, two “angels in white” sit where Jesus’ body once was. Upon being asked by the angels, “Woman, why are you crying?” it becomes clear that Mary is desperate to find Jesus. She begs a man (whom she believes to be the gardener) to tell her where he has put Jesus. This man repeats the angels’ question in asking, “Woman, why are you crying?” Upon witnessing Mary’s reply of desperation, the man then simply states “Mary,” thus revealing himself as Jesus. Jesus, who has been Resurrected, then consoles Mary, “Do not hold on to…show more content…
In the beginning verses, Mary Magdalene is asked the same question twice. The two angels and the man - later revealed to be Jesus - both ask the same question: “Woman, why are you crying?” Upon being asked by the two angels, Mary verbalizes her distress; she does not know where Jesus’ body has been taken. Upon being asked by the man, whom she believes to be the gardener, Mary responds in the same manner. However, as soon as she learns that this man is Jesus, Mary is immediately consoled. Because Mary could not be consoled by the two angels or the “gardener,” the fact that Jesus is able to calm Mary so quickly is highlighted. Furthermore, instead of clinging to Jesus, Mary does what he asks of her; she lets him go and leaves to explain to the disciples that she has seen the Lord. Despite her previous distress, Mary lets Jesus go as soon as she does find him. It is clear, then, that Mary trusts Jesus. Jesus’ words have the power to console Mary and to persuade her to put her own feelings aside in order to follow Jesus’…show more content…
While the Fourth Gospel is given the conventional title “John,” the gospel itself is anonymous ("John, Gospel According to"). The dates of composition of the Fourth Gospel are still disputed today, however, the “latest reasonable date for the Gospel 's composition is before 100 C.E” ("John, Gospel According to"). Thus, it is possible that John’s Gospel drew upon the Synoptic Gospels, despite the fact that many of the events in these accounts differ. In John 20:11-18, Jesus’ Resurrection is explained in an admirable manner, “In the Fourth Gospel, the story of the crucifixion is one of glorification, inseparable from the resurrection” ("John, Gospel According to"). The Fourth Gospel’s glorification of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection portrays Jesus as a divine being more so than as a human
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