Marty Anderson's Case Study Traditional Golf Carts

1141 Words5 Pages
Marty Anderson was an employee for Family Auto Repair (FAR) in Memphis and was transfer to their Jackson store, which was an hour and a half from his house. The company allow Marty to use a company vehicle to make his long commute, although he had his own vehicle. The terms of the explicit permission to use the vehicle were: to and from work, during lunch breaks, and to deliver and transfer items between FAR’s two facilities either before work or on his way home. Marty Anderson became a victim of the dilemma when he fell asleep at the wheel and injured a man, Steve Spritzer, in the company vehicle, at a time when he did not have explicit permission to be using the vehicle. Marty Anderson’s case can be argued in his favor or in FAR’s favor,…show more content…
The NHTSA regulation defines golf carts that can achieve a speed between 20-25 miles per hour as low-speed vehicles. Low-speed vehicles can subject to the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety (FMVS) Standard No. 500 (49 CFR 571.500). The FMVS standard requires low-speed vehicles to be equipped with headlamps, stop lamps, turn signal lamps, tail lamps, reflex reflectors, parking brakes, rearview mirrors, windshields, seat belts, and vehicle identification numbers (NHTSA, 1998). Any golf car capable of under 20mph is exempt from NHSA laws and are subject only to state and local laws involving the safety equipment. Vehicles that are able to achieve over 20 mph are treated as motor vehicles. Therefore, Electro’s golf cars would be required to abide by NHTSA…show more content…
These carts are able to achieve speeds over 20mph and are considered motor vehicles (NHTSA, 2008). Another thing for Electro to think about on top of the 35 mile per hour limit is also the weight limit. "We [NHTSA] believe that vehicles over 3,000 pounds are capable of complying with the full requirements" of the federal motor vehicle safety standards. Increasing the allowable gross vehicle weight, NHTSA said, "would encourage the use of [low-speed vehicles] in circumstances where it could pose an unreasonable risk to safety (Status Report, 2008)." No information is given regarding the weight of the golf car, however if it exceed 3,000 pounds the safety requirements would he increased. Florida state laws require a certain safety standard before LSVs are allow to be used on a public road. The safety requirements are identical to those covered by the Federal Standard 517, they include: “A low-speed vehicle must be equipped with headlamps, stop lamps, turn signal lamps, taillamps, reflex reflectors, parking brakes, rearview mirrors, windshields, seat belts, and vehicle identification numbers”(NHTSA, 2008). The LSVs are only allowed to be used on public roads that have a speed limit of 35 mph or less. The vehicles must be insured, and may only be driven by a licensed

    More about Marty Anderson's Case Study Traditional Golf Carts

      Open Document