Marriage in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

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Marriage in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen Marriage then, ideally is a love match, and still ideally, more is involved- the character and fortune of the lover “Marriage then, ideally is a love match, and still ideally, more is involved- the character and fortune of the lover.” Jane Austen made this quote when she was describing her idea of a perfect marriage. Her quote shows us that she knows that not all marriages will turn out like she would want them to, but she has an idea on what a marriage should be. The term ‘ideally’ means that it should be perfect and her ambition is very strong in what a marriage should turn out like, however her quote is opposed by practically. She thinks that marriage should be based around more then just love and it should be more on character. The term ‘fortune’ means that not all marriages are based around love and that sometimes fortune does come into it. This is perfectly demonstrated in Pride and Prejudice between Darcy and Elizabeth when Elizabeth first catches a glimpse of Pemberly and she falls in love with the house and then eventually with Darcy. The book pride and prejudice begins with an aphorism about marriage, which shows us that marriage had a lot of importance back when she was writing her book. Jane Austen’s view on marriage is that in the right circumstances it is a wonderful thing and that everyone should be happy in a marriage, however if they do not fit the quote she has given, then it is not worth getting married. Jane Austen never married; her quote was ideally a fantasy on what she thought a good marriage would be and maybe what she hoped she would find in a man. She was a victim of the system of marriage and social status so her books are based around this system. She was a victim because she turned down the chance to marry after originally accepting the proposal. She then became a social out cast and could never marry
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