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Marital Discord in ‘Madame Bovary’ by Gustave Flaubert and ‘Like Water for Chocolate’ by Laura Esquivel

analytical Essay
1554 words
1554 words
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In Literature and Life, Love is a powerful force. Sans love; feelings, desires and relationships may seem empty. This force however, can also be destructive, even may end a marriage. Marital discord, arising in general, due to infatuation, lust or affection for a third person, may crop up primarily facilitated by adverse familial, economic or societal conditions that do frequently find their mention in the written word. Some of these concerns like family, marriage, sexuality, society and death, are notably illustrated by the authors, Gustave Flaubert in Madame Bovary and Laura Esquivel in Like Water for Chocolate.

Bring Rosaura in.

These works under study present the marriages of Emma-Charles Bovary in Madame Bovary and Rosaura-Pedro in Like Water for Chocolate that are shaken at the end of each plot. It seems that marital discord is an indirect corollary of the roughness that was forced upon both the female protagonists, Emma and Tita. The cruelty imposed on Tita, as quite evident, was by virtue of her relationship with Mama Elena; her being the youngest daughter who was thus traditionally disallowed marriage and obligated to serve her mother for as long as she (mother) lived.

On the other hand, on Emma’s rough times were much subtle and, to an extent, self-carved. Ms. Roualt lived with her father and while in a convent school, she was initially devoted to “learning her catechism well”. However, as romantic novels came along with an old spinster working there, Emma began to fancy the “love affairs…tears and kisses, skiffs in the moonlight…”1 With these books, Emma would occasionally drift into the “alluring phantasmagoria of genuine emotion”1. Then, as the readers may understand, Emma started fantasizing and drawing a veil of...

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...laws of Emma ( perennial dissatisfaction, adultery, extravagance) and Rosaura (jealousy) that end up in their tragedy.

Works Cited

1 Page 36, chapter 6, part I, Madame Bovary, written by Gustave Flaubert and translated into English by Lowell Bair, Bantam Classics

2 Chapter 6, Volume 1, Pride and Prejudice written by Jane Austen

3 Page 60, Chapter 9, Part I, Madame Bovary, written by Gustave Flaubert and translated into English by Lowell Bair, Bantam Classics

4 Page 33, chapter 5, part I, Madame Bovary, written by Gustave Flaubert and translated into English by Lowell Bair, Bantam Classics

5 Page 32, chapter 5, part I, Madame Bovary, written by Gustave Flaubert, translated into English by Lowell Bair, Bantam Classics

6 Page 86, Chapter 3, part II, Madame Bovary, written by Gustave Flaubert, translated into English by Lowell Bair, Bantam Classics

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that love is a powerful force in literature and life. it can be destructive and end marriages.
  • Analyzes how the marriages of emma-charles bovary and rosaura-pedro in like water for chocolate are shaken at the end of each plot. marital discord is an indirect corollary of the roughness forced upon both the female protagonists, emma and tita.
  • Analyzes how emma's rough times were subtle and, to an extent, self-carved. ms. roualt was devoted to learning her catechism well, but she began fantasizing and drawing a veil of illusions from the real world.
  • Analyzes the book madame bovary, written by gustave flaubert and translated into english by lowell bair, bantam classics.
  • Compares tita's domineering mother and her bonding with pedro muzquiz in like water for chocolate. both s portray the story of these women depicting a fundamental likeness on the subject of marital discord.
  • Explains that gustave flaubert's part i, madame bovary, was translated into english by lowell bair, bantam classics.
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