Manipulation In A Doll's House

1196 Words5 Pages
Henrik Ibsen’s screenplay A Doll’s House is a tantalizing story between a married couple and their lives during the 19th century; an era which for woman was highly oppressed, period in time where men ruled the household as business, whereas their wife played the docile obedient lady of the home. Therefor they followed their husbands and fathers implicitly until Nora. Nora sets the stage of her life, starting in her father’s home; she is a stage onto herself. According to Ibsen; little secrets told not only to ourselves but to those around us, find a way to resurface. The ability to understand changes as life’s little secret unfold their true meaning is found in A Doll’s House being played out with Nora learning the art of manipulation of lies.…show more content…
Ibsen’s spotlight on everyday matters of a married couple delivers a test of fortitude; marriage, love, life and how this dance is perform daily. Torvald’s happiness is dependent on order; “Home-life ceases to be free and beautiful as soon as it is founded on borrowing and debt,” (Act I 4) these spoken words focus on borrowing and debt, but are easily replaced with “chaos and willfulness” without change to the meaning. While Torvald carries his own set of secrets such as what the ideal home, wife, and mother means; Nora fulfills his minds play of a doll, placing her where he wishes and manipulates her with playful words of “my squirrel”, “my little lark”, and “my little spendthrift.” These spirited gibes are meant to keep her in place, as the obedient wife. Unknowingly at first Nora plays her roll well; bouncing playfully along with Torvald’s pet names given that she has an agenda of her own, little…show more content…
Edvard Beyer quoted in Aderholts translation of the Henrik Ibsen play, “There is hardly a single line that does not have a demonstrable dramatic function…. And all of a sudden single everyday words take on a double meaning of foreboding undertones.” (2) Nora’s “important thing” and Mrs. Linde’s “[y]ou are a child” are just a few exhibits of Ibsen’s double meanings. “Important thing,” the misrepresentation, a secret, laid the foundation of colored building blocks of their eight years of marriage. Is this truly the start of that first lying block Nora so easily laid down? No, it started with the injustices her father played upon her; treating her as his little doll, a doll to play dress-up and present his doting daughter to others. Subsequently, it was not hard for Torvald to continue Nora’s life as a living doll; his own game within as she is a willing subject. “[Quite] right, Christine. You see, Torvald loves me so indescribably, he wants to have me all to himself, as he says.” (Act II 54) Reveals how Torvald wants his toy all to himself; all along Nora knowing this she plays along with the game. While she keeps Torvald from finding out her biggest secret, she knowingly continues to play the role of Nora the doll; helpless without direction from the puppet master. Impressively Ibsen’s suggestions are lines of double meaning and the game of manipulation between Nora and those surrounding
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