Maldistribution in Organizations

807 Words4 Pages
When you get out of class, you open the doors that lead you to the outside world and you take in a big whiff of air. You look around and you see different types of people who roam the same surface you walk on. People have always been looking for equality amongst themselves but there is no such thing as equality. In order to achieve such thing, civilization would have to start from scratch. Now when I talk about equality, I’m talking about the equal distribution between wealth, status, and privilege. This has evolved into a significant problem of the modern world. Some are able to buy finer things than others. Some are allowed much more access than others. Some are allowed to do things rather others can not. This is known as social inequality and society deems it as a way to diversify groups and carve up all kinds of organizations. People may take it that different is bad and inequality is a good thing but if you really take into account of it, you can really understand that if everyone was equal and the same, the world would be really bland. No one wants to be the same. Everyone wants to be different and unique in their own way. Competition drives society. It is about influence which drives the community. When one sees another develop themselves into something better, people follow. This is politics. One is to influence and gain authority. A person’s power, authority, or influence exists in relation to others. Taking this information in leads to how things are not equal and how there is always a higher force that contradicts a lower force. This is the idea of colonization. In "Why can’t people feed themselves", the colonial regime took their power and authority over the farms and made them convert from subsistence farms to cash ... ... middle of paper ... ...st lower ranks? This is all up to opinion and that dominance is not really in the view of production. Works Cited Angeloni, Elvio. Annual Editions: Anthropology, Thirty-Fourth Edition. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2011. Print. Arenson, Lauren & Miller-Thayer, Jennifer. Cultures of the United States. Michigan: Hayden McNeil Publishing. 2009. Print. Frances, Lappe M., and Collins Joseph. Why Can’t People Feed Themselves? 1977. Anthropology 11/12. By Elvio Angeloni. New York: McGraw-Hill/Contemporary Learning Series, 2011. 178-82. Print. John, Bodley. The Price of Progress. 1998. Anthropology 11/12. By Elvio Angeloni. New York: McGraw-Hill/Contemporary Learning Series, 2011. 199-204. Print. Laura, Graham. The Tractor Invasion. 2009. Anthropology 11/12. By Elvio Angeloni. New York: McGraw-Hill/Contemporary Learning Series, 2011. 183-87. Print.
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