Magwitch Character Analysis

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Crouching in the damp, soft grass, a boy was hunched over a gravestone. He was gazing intently at the words inscribed on a particular stone which looked weathered but not enough so that it was unreadable. Several others just like it lay in a row nearby with just enough space for a small body to be buried there. There looked to be about five more small tombstones, but with the heavy fog surrounding the marshy area it was hard to tell where anything truly was. The headstone the boy sat in front of however was large enough to fit an adult man. The boy’s fingers traced the letters that had been imprinted on the dark stone some time ago. The concentration he held was uncommon for a boy of that age. Whispering could be heard coming from his lips, but barely any of it was recognizable. Perhaps he was mumbling a prayer to himself for the dead. Perhaps he was wishing that he could go play instead of having to sit in a damp, dark graveyard. Perhaps he was merely taking a walk and stopped for a rest. Suddenly, the boy stood up and turned abruptly to leave. ‘No, not yet,’ Magwitch remembered thinking to himself. The dark man went to move his leg to go towards the innocent boy but was jolted back as if his foot had been caught. Magwitch felt his ankle chafing against a rough, cold piece of metal that had rubbed his inner foot for so long that he feared the skin might never grow back. The criminal had learned to ignore it after countless years in prison, but he was ready to be done with the wretched thing. His mind sought desperately for a plan when the boy began to walk towards the gravestone Magwitch was crouching behind. Without thinking, the man made a grab for the small boy, and his cold, muddy hands clasped upon the youth’s warm flesh. ... ... middle of paper ... ...Charles. Great Expectations.. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1942. Kindle Book. Fadem, Richard. Great Expectations Annotated, with Commentary. BookDoors.com, 2012. NOOK Book. Hibbert, Christopher. Charles Dickens: The Making of a Literary Giant. Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. Kindle Book. Morrison, Samuel. “Magwitch – The Man Who Could Never Be a Gentleman.” The Imperial Archive. School of English at the Queen’s University of Belfast. June 17, 2007. Internet. October 11, 2013. Santoro, Christina. “Magwitch: A Father Figure?” The Victorian Web. Brown University, 2009. Web. November 25, 2013. Tan, Glenda Shuying. “A Widening Rift in Joe and Pip’s Relationship.” The Victorian Web. Brown University, 2009. Web. November 23, 2013. Weidler, Danielle. “The Punishment of Convicts in Ninteenth-Century England.” The Victorian Web. Brown University, 1995. Web. November 23, 2013.
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