Love Of Glory In Beowulf

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Beowulf. When most people hear the name they tend to think about his battles and fighting. However, the majority of people would overlook the traits of how Beowulf exemplifies the Anglo-Saxon culture. For instance, throughout the epic poem, Beowulf, it shows the culture of the ANglo-Saxon by how the characters show their love of glory, loyalty to a leader, and their belief in fate. Throughout the epic poem, Beowulf shows his love for glory by fighting for his kingdom. Beowulf was Geatland’s greatest warrior which means that he was always thirsty for a battle. So once Geatland found out that Denmark was being terrorized by Grendel, Beowulf was the first to help. One of the first ways the epic shows this trait of a love of glory is after the…show more content…
Another way that an Anglo-Saxon warrior shows their love of glory is shown br Christopher Garcia: “A hero must be willing to die to achieve glory” (The Anglo-Saxon Hero). With this being said the warriors are to put everything on the line to achieve the ultimate amount of glory. Which is to die for one’s country or kingdom. These are just a few out of many ways Beowulf shows the Anglo-Saxon love of glory. Another trait of the Anglo-Saxon culture is loyalty to a leader. Which is a trait that is still shown today all throughout the world. For example, in the epic poem Beowulf the Geats show their loyalty to their leader when: “Beowulf is fighting with Grendel the Geats have their swords ready” (353-356). With the Geats being ready for the battle if their leader fails shows that they are loyal enough…show more content…
The belief in fate for the Anglo-Saxon’s is everything to them. For example, when Beowulf is about to fight Grendel: “fate intended him to gnaw the bones of his last human supper”(295). So Grendel’s fate has already been determined that he was going to lose and die to Beowulf. Also, this is a biblical allusion referring to Jesus’s last supper indicating that Grendel will perish because it was already decided for him that fate was not on Grendel’s side anymore but on Beowulf’s. For the Anglo-Saxons their belief in fate was one of the most important traits of their culture. When Beowulf is fighting the dragon he can tell that fate has switched its loyalty. For example, in the epic poem Beowulf’s shield fails him from the start which is indicating slightly that fate is no longer on his side; best said by Renee Yewdaev: “A great warrior can fight his best but if fate is not on his side that day, then he will lose.” (Beowulf). With this being said no matter how good of a fighter you are will not matter if fate is not on your side. As seen in the epic poem, when Beowulf’s shield fails completely allowing the dragon to strike and inflict Beowulf with poison; thus ending his life. However, looking back before Beowulf was slain he would fight as if it were his last. As Anglo-Saxon view fate the same way as specified by Rene Yewdaev:”After all, if a man has not already been predetermined to die, the his
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