Love And Basketball Play Analysis

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Not only does the film Love and Basketball demonstrate lot of feminist elements, but it has a lot of black feminist elements. Written and directed by Gina Prince-Bythewood, a black woman, and starring many other black women, Love & Basketball is not just a warm coming-of-age story, but also a soothing relief for gender relations among black men and women. This movie redefines and defies the societal norms placed on women, while also addressing many stigmas that are placed on males and their “maleness”. As a society there are a lot of qualities that men have been socialized to uphold when it comes to how they act or react, what they support, and what they suppress. This movie produces a harsh critique of male socialization early on and continues…show more content…
Men don’t quit. Men aren’t weak. This idea can lead one to believe that if these qualities are only related to men, then they cant be demonstrated through women, which is what Quincy ultimately thinks. Monica is a girl who can play basketball better than Quincy (causing him to react violently, pushing her down). She wants to do the same things he does (play basketball), can do everything he can, and won’t allow him to boss her around. These early scenes serve multiple purposes: we see how Monica and Quincy meet, their childhood courtship, and we see Monica tear down all of the masculine nonsense his father has taught…show more content…
He wants to play basketball on the same team wearing the same number, but Zeke would rather Quincy get an education. There is an interesting tension here between the father who wants something different and the son who merely wants to imitate. The issue, which Quincy doesn’t understand until later, is that Zeke doesn’t want his son to become like him. Zeke has a failed marriage due to serial adultery. He’s a washed-up basketball player who didn’t even play for a very good team. In one of the film’s most wrenching scenes, an older Quincy asks his father, “how come you couldn’t be the kind of man you kept trying to make me?” Zeke replies with, “I just couldn’t son.” This characterization is critical without being dogmatic. It doesn’t let Zeke off the hook but it shows him trying to correct his mistakes with his
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