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Louisa May Alcott

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Louisa May Alcott. Alone, these words mean nothing, but together they spark to life a real, highly spirited, and independent person. Louisa May Alcott is a famous children’s American author with a rebellious spirit, having ideas that challenge the society of that time. She lived from November 29, 1832 to March 6, 1888, passing from this world at age 56. Her surroundings certainly influence her works, for she lived during the Transcendentalism and Romantic periods, not to mention the ghastly, but necessary Civil War. Transcendentalism and romanticism brought new ideas, literature, and ways of life and beliefs, and Alcott knew two great philosophers of that time, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. She lived with her parents and her three sisters in several places throughout Massachusetts. Alcott worked very hard for her family, and started writing about her childhood in stories. Her best-known novel is “Little Women” or “Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy”. Louisa May Alcott is a very spirited author that melts the ice in even the coldest of hearts with her inspirational, heart-warming stories.

Alcott seems to be a great author, but her works came from her own life. Louisa May Alcott was born on November 29, 1832, in Germantown, Pennsylvania to (Amos) Bronson Alcott and Abigail “Abba” May. Bronson was a “thinker” and a teacher, introducing the revolutionary idea of “enjoyable thinking”, in a world full of strict teachers and repetitive lessons. Abigail May was a strong-willed daughter from a noble Boston family, and even though country life was hard, she willingly took the responsibilities. It was from each of them, did Louisa receive something important. From her mother, she received her “long, chestnut-colored hair, her brown eyes,...

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... her best-known children’s novel. That and her other many writings are packed full of messages; Louisa herself is a message and inspiration. She wanted something better, and saw girls as equal as boys, hence participation in the women’s suffrage movement. Her works would mainly be recommended for young women up to twenty, but anyone could read them and be satisfied. They would then continue the works because, even though the language is difficult like other classics, the stories compel one to read on and stay in the “cocoon” created in the book. As a personal critique, Louisa May Alcott is a very realistic author; she draws one in right with her. As a person, she proves that women can be who they want to be, despite popular beliefs. Louisa May Alcott, born over 100 years ago, is still one of the most influential people of all time, especially for aspiring women.