Literary Analysis Of Robinson Crusoe

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Robinson Crusoe Analysis As boys grow into men they go through a series of changes, leaving them doubting both themselves and their beliefs. One specific author who explores this is Daniel Defoe, the author of Robinson Crusoe. In this publication, Defoe writes about a man who emerges from a series of catastrophes as a symbol of man’s ability to survive the tests of nature. Because of the many hardships that Defoe encountered throughout his life, writing about a man whose thoughts and internal struggles mirrored his own helps to give the publication a sense of realism. Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe is a fictional narrative that introduces prose fiction and proposes multiple themes that dabbles on various serious topics, such as religion.…show more content…
An in text example of this is, “Seeing all these things have not brought thee to repentance, now thou shalt die” (Defoe 247). Robinson Crusoe is a novel that depicts a moral tale illustrating how one should live one’s life. This is indicated in the Preface, which goes over the religious aspects of the story, covering God’s wisdom. One vital part of His wisdom is the importance of the repentance of one’s sins. Another example is, “As I had once done thus in breaking away from my Parents, so I could not be content now…” (Defoe 37). The importance of self-awareness is another prominent theme in Robinson Crusoe. An example of this is, “Poor Robinson Crusoe...where have you been” (Defoe 179)? Crusoe teaches his parrot to say these words, which shows his impulse towards self-awareness. By teaching the parrot this phrase he gives nature itself the means to voice his own self-awareness. A second example of this theme is, “I have no soul to speak or to relieve me” (Defoe 60). Parts of Robinson Crusoe have a detached tone. For example, “Even when I was afterwards, on due Consideration, made sensible of my Condition, how I was cast on this dreadful Place, out of the Reach of humane Kind, out of all…show more content…
Man vs. Nature is one type of conflict present in the novel. For instance, “By this time it blew a terrible Storm indeed, and now I began to see Terror and Amazement in the Faces even of the Seamen themselves. The master, tho ' vigilant to the Business of preserving the Ship, yet as he went in and out of his Cabbin by men, I could hear him softly to himself say several times, Lord be merciful to us, we shall be all lost, we shall be all undone; and the like” (Defoe 63). Initially, the natural world is a terrifying place for Crusoe. The stormy sea sends him into a frenzy of fear and fright. The constant change of nature often prompts both Crusoe and the crew to turn to God for comfort. This is also shown when he says, “...But it was enough to affect me then, who was but a young Sailor, and had never known any thing of the matter” (Defoe 75). Man vs. Self is also a present conflict in Robinson Crusoe. By way of illustration, “I never so much as troubl’d myself, to confider what I should do with my self, when I came thither; what would become of me; if I fell into the Hands of Savages; or how I should escape from them, if they attempted me; no, nor so much as how it was possible for to reach the Coast, and not to be attempted by some or other of them, without any Possibility of delivering my self; and if I should not fall into their Hands, what I should do for Provision, or whither I should bend my Course; none
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