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Lift the Trade Ban on Cuba

opinionated Essay
2003 words
2003 words
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Unlock the Gate to Cuba In the long and turbulent history between Cuba and the United States, it can well be argued that Cuba did not turn out quite like its other Latin American peers. Things seemed to be on the right track in the early 1900’s, when it appeared that Cuba was destined for a future of “independence”, like its neighbour Puerto Rico and it was yet another South American nation rife with the now atypical blend of affluent American investors and poor workers usually native to the land herself. However, following a coup d’état that saw the fall of the American-backed Fulgencio Batista in favour of his social antithesis in communist Fidel Castro, the situation rapidly turned sour. The American government, finding themselves backed into a corner and unable to mold Cuba in its golden image, decided that it would be pertinent to sever all trade with Cuba. Since America’s policies towards Communism were clear, the trade embargo began to look like a more long-term intervention. To this day, the trade embargo is still in place, and it appears unlikely that this president, as well as many more from those who will succeed him, is ready to discuss any possible amendment. However, these economic sanctions have seen its efficacy come to an abrupt end. The ban on Cuban trade should be lifted in order to reduce poverty on the island, boost the economies of both the United States and Cuba, give America access to superior healthcare and allow America to acquire some cheap labour. In this essay, I will inform you of four things; (1) Cuba’s poverty caused by the sanctions, (2) how lifting the embargo would benefit Cuba, (3) how lifting the embargo would benefit America, (4) why continue the sanctions (5) how close are we to lifting the sanctions. Cuba’s Poverty It is not difficult to identify Cuba as a “developing” nation: a quick glance around at the grimy, graffiti-filled streets, rampant propagandist billboards and the cars, clanking along with broken fenders in tow and a volatility and tint that suggest that their primes passed 50 years hence are enough of an indication. Indeed, those sepia-toned prosperous days under communist rule having come and gone, there has been little to no influx of money to replace and refurbish aging buildings, automobiles, schools, roads and above all, aging policies. When asked what they thought ab... ... middle of paper ... ... by simply giving passing reference to that presumed inevitability? It is intolerable to think that we are so far away from a solution. Furthermore, they have labelled Cuba as part of a “secondary” axis of evil. Worse yet, John Bolton, the Undersecretary of State for Arms Control, has stated that “Cuba has long provided safe haven for terrorists”, and “that Cuba has been developing biological weapons of mass destruction.” Figures. Finally, It is clear that there is a serious issue regarding poverty in Cuba that directly results from the forty year old sanctions. It would benefit both countries to lift the sanctions in terms of trade, immigration and development. The sanctions have so far proven unsuccessful, and are just hindering the Cuban economy. Despite all of these points, it seems doubtful that the doors to Cuba shall be unlocked, and that the poverty and suffering could continue forever until we get another FDR-like president who has enough sense to change something. Word count: 2002

In this essay, the author

  • Opines that while the tourism industry has risen in spite of the extreme poverty, sex tourism in cuba is directly related to it.
  • Opines that the main problem lies in the absence of trade with the world's greatest superpower.
  • Opines that there is a serious issue regarding poverty in cuba that directly results from the forty year old sanctions. it would benefit both countries to lift the sanctions in terms of trade, immigration and development.
  • Argues that cuba didn't turn out quite like its other latin american peers in the early 1900's. after the coup d'état, the american government decided that it would be pertinent to sever all trade with cuba.
  • Explains that cuba is a "developing" nation, with grimy, graffiti-filled streets, rampant propagandist billboards, broken fenders in tow, and volatility and tint.
  • Argues that the lifting of the embargo would create a tremendous imports and exports market between the two countries.
  • Explains that america's chief interest in cuba lies in its stunning sandy beaches, undeveloped land which investors eye as high-potential locations for expensive luxury beach resorts.
  • Explains that the backbone of american life is immigration. the poor cuban immigrated to the states in search of work, and they were exploited by professionals.
  • Explains that the original purpose behind the sanctions was to remove fidel castro from power, and purge cuba of communism.
  • Opines that the current presidency is signaling that there is no chance that access to cuba is a possibility.
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