Kathryn Stockett's Racial Segregation Of The 1960s

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Racial Segregation of the 1960s The 1960s was the time when women and men were treated with cruelty, were paid barely enough money to spend on food, and were beaten senseless just because of their race. Though it sounds like an excruciating life to live, many of these African Americans lived life to the fullest despite what others thought of them. In Kathryn Stockett’s The Help, African Americans are treated hastily by whites, as analyzed by the book’s historical significance, personal analysis, and literary criticisms to fully comprehend life in the 1960s of the south. In order for an audience member to comprehend the meaning of The Help, one must learn the history of segregation of the 1960s. For instance, everything started to become segregated…show more content…
For example, a lot of colloquialism was used when Aibileen, a character in The Help, said, “I reckon that’s the risk you run, letting somebody else raise you chilluns” (Stockett 2). Because African Americans were treated unequally, they were denied a good education just because they spoke very differently than white people. The speech of an African American was one of the many reasons why whites were racist towards them. Also, Aibileen used slang when she said, “Around Lunchtime, when my stories come on tee-vee, it gets quiet out in the carport” (22). An African American’s word choice may be considered colloquialism because they use a lot of slang in their daily language. Aibileen, from The Help, is one character that talks with a very uneducated mannerism. Overall, the way that an African American talks can decide on how a racist a white person was towards…show more content…
As a matter of fact, it is known that Hilly, a character from The Help, has gruesome character traits when she said, “It’s just plain dangerous. Everybody knows they carry different kinds of diseases than we do” (10). Many white people assumed that all African Americans were dirty and diseased. This is one of the reasons why the help had separate bathrooms than their white and wealthy bosses. This also led to a dead African American who used a whites’ bathroom. Also, it is hinted that Aibileen’s boss is very hard to please when Aibileen said, “Trying to cover up something else she doesn’t like the look of in the house” (33). Some white bosses treated their maids very horribly and were never pleased with their work. In this case, Aibileen’s boss seemed to never be happy with the things that Aibileen does, despite the small pay. When reading The Help, one must remember to search for rhetorical devices, such as colloquialism and characterization to gain a full understanding of an African American’s daily life in the
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