Jean Rhys's Writing Style In Wide Sargasso Sea

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Philip Antohi Journal Assignment Two: Analyzing Style in Wide Sargasso Sea Jean Rhys’ writing style is no doubt one of the unique writing styles in the prose genre. Her book Wide Sargasso Sea epitomizes this writing style and is also regarded as one of her best works. One of the characteristics associated with her writing style is the mode of narration that the book takes on, being narrated by several persons throughout the story. The second part of the book, for example, is narrated by Rochester Antoinette’s husband. The use of Rochester as the narrator in this part allows the reader to view Antoinette and other characters in the book though the eyes of a non-familiar character. Rochester, despite being married to Antoinette, has only known…show more content…
The use of simple language makes the novel more accessible to persons of different levels of education. One does not need to have a great understanding of the English language or contain the highest level of vocabulary so as to read and understand the novel. That is not to say however, that the novel is simplistic in form. Simple language is only meant to make the novel accessible to persons from different parts of the world, and the author ultimately achieved this aim since the novel is considered one of the classics of English…show more content…
Tragedies are one of the most celebrated forms of writing and Wide Sargasso Sea definitely has a tragic connotation that increases its appeal to the reader. Firstly, Annette was the wife of a powerful rich man, and she was considerably beautiful as well, and so these elements set her up to be a kind of tragic hero. Antoinette, being the daughter of a powerful man and a beautiful woman during the slavery era, is also a possible tragic hero. The events that occur after the death of Antoinette’s husband are nothing short of tragic for the two women. They lose Pierre through a fire incident, both women get married to men that cannot be described as loving, and both suffer from poor mental states. Furthermore, the misfortunes that befall the two ladies are made all the more agonizing by the implication that the ladies had little to no choice in controlling their destinies. All these are characteristics of a tragedy plot, and although the novel cannot be classified as a tragedy, the connotation is quite clear. It points to the author’s literary maturity since she can successfully embed tragic elements without disturbing the plot or flow of the
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