Jay Gatsby American Dream Analysis

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Jay Gatsby & The American Dream The American standard of success has always been defined by the effort put into receiving this success. Some are lucky and have success come with ease, others have to put in a great deal of work and even then they still fall short of their desired position. Throughout, “The Great Gatsby”, F. Scott Fitzgerald scrutinizes the collapse of the American dream through Jay Gatsby. Through the eyes of Nick Carraway, the readers experience the rise and fall of Jay Gatsby’s successes. From the initial sequences of the novel it is apparent that wealthiness is the point of which you are judged in the time period the book takes place. Nick Carraway moves to New York in search of a career through the stock market. Upon…show more content…
Their usual business continues onward until Tom’s suspicions are aroused. The affair was close to being uncovered with Buchanan asking Nick Carraway what he knows about it. Tension between Mr. Buchanan and Gatsby becomes apparent and relationships begin to fray. One night when Jay Gatsby is allowing Daisy to drive his car, she fatally hits Mrs. Wilson and flees from the scene. Bystanders recognized Gatsby’s car, leading everyone to see Gatsby in a new light, destroying the reputation he’s put up for so long in hopes to eventually woo Daisy. At this point readers would assume that Gatsby meets his downfall with Tom Buchanan, but F. Scott Fitzgerald had something else in mind. Mrs. Wilson’s husband finds out while in the home of Nick Carraway about the car responsible for killing his beloved wife. He then proceeds to go to Gatsby’s estate and shoots him dead in his pool, then takes his own…show more content…
While you could argue Gatsby being in a pivotal point of his own life as well, he already accomplished the most he probably could have. His one and only focus was Daisy Buchanan and even for years when he had not the slightest clue of her whereabouts, he still kept going and going. Nothing could stop a man like Jay Gatsby from finding this woman once more and that is exactly what he ended up doing. Jordan Baker also alludes to these contrasting properties between Carraway and Gatsby. Baker in comparison to Daisy Buchanan is boyish and athletic in a sense, at least much more so than Mrs. Buchanan. While Daisy was considered rich by societal standards, she was essentially being paired with Tom Buchanan’s money, whereas Jordan Baker was wealthy through her own hard work and professional golfing career. To recollect, F. Scott Fitzgerald scrutinizes the collapse of the American Dream through Jay Gatsby in, “The Great Gatsby.” From his highs to his lows, the reader experiences this fall of an idea through the eyes of the narrator in a powerful story of wealth and
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