Is Maslow's Hierarchy Of Needs?

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What is Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs? Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is a theory in psychology that was first presented by Abraham Maslow in a paper entitled “A Theory of Human Motivation” in 1943. The theory includes five hierarchy levels of needs and is usually displayed as a pyramid. The bottom level is “Physiological”, the next level is “Safety”, the level above that is “Social”, the next level is “Esteem” and the highest level is “Self-actualization”. As told by McLeod (2007) an individual must fulfill lower level needs before advancing upwards towards the next level of needs. The bottom level, “Physiological” needs are basic physical requirements such as; food, water sleep and warmth, the next level up is “Security” and it refers to…show more content…
This need encompasses love, the need for intimate bonds with others. Bonds such as friendship or personal relationship become important. Once that need is met then “Esteem” or the feeling of achievement needs to be met. Finally, “Self-actualization” is accomplished. “Self-actualization is the realization of the full potential that one possesses. What Motivates People in Each Level The two bottom levels of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Theory are deficiency motivators. If a person’s physiological and safety needs are not met than they will suffer a deficit and this will delay their development. They will not progress on to the next stage. The next three levels of development are growth needs. This refers to an individual’s desire to grow as a person. Supervisors must understand the different Hierarchy levels to understand the motivators and who it relates to employees. On the physiological level the motivation for employees is an…show more content…
Fredrick Herzberg was a Psychologist whose theory includes the two-factor theory of job satisfaction. One factor is hygiene and the other factor is motivation. Hygiene factors are actually dissatisfying job factors. An example of this is: poor work environment or a poor relationship with supervisor. Employees are happiest when they work in a positive work environment as told by Brunot (2013). Motivators include factors for job satisfaction such as, recognition and promotions. Herzberg believed that job dissatisfaction and job satisfactions are not complete opposites, in fact his research proved that are distinctly different things. Just because job dissatisfying factors are eliminated does not mean that there is improvement and job enrichment. He taught that the way to create improvement and job enrichment is to create conditions for job satisfaction and this will motivate employees. An example of this is to offer training with the intention of internal promotions. According to Ritzenhein (2000) the teachings of Herzberg suggest that to motivate, one must get rid of the dissatisfying job factors first and then look for ways to promote growth within the
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