Invasive Species

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In the year 1973, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) was instituted in order to bring attention to the issue of species that are in danger of extinction as well as to provide conservation of species that are endangered or threatened. Currently, there are around 2,245 species that the Endangered Species Act lists as either endangered or threatened throughout the world, many of which are found in the United States ecosystems and a handful that are only found in foreign ecosystems (Ehrlich 12). Because of the considerable number of endangered species, people should be aware of endangered species and help to protect these creatures society, as their unnatural extinction due to our actions and neglect will affect ecosystems and the environment (“Why…show more content…
Invasive species are organisms that have “moved into an area in which it previously did not exist” (Snider, Mahan, and Holloway).Often times, the introduction of invasive species is usually for the purpose of controlling a native species that is considered a pest, but sometimes they are introduced because people are importing them as pets or ornamental plants, and even sometimes they are introduced as a mistake (Evans). Many environmental scientists consider invasive species as the most dangerous cause of endangerment, because they affect the biodiversity of ecosystems and biological communities, thus affecting the natural food webs and habitats of species. Ehrlich actually contributes fifty-four percent of the one hundred and seventy extinct species, of which the causes of extinction have been reliably identified, directly to invasive species (Ehrlich 37). Therefore, the introduction of invasive species to any new environment causes a threat to the ecosystems, as the foreign species will fight to survive and ultimately thrive in its new environment, meaning that invasive species hold the risk of pushing native species into extinction (Ehrlich…show more content…
The main threats that the bald eagle species faced were habitat destruction and degradation, illegal shooting, as well as the issue of contamination (Guernsey). In the year 1963, the population of bald eagles was down to the low number of 417 breeding pairs, and this is mostly due to the use of DDT, an insecticide (Guernsey). The ultimate recovery of the bald eagles is due to the efforts of the Endangered Species Act as well as the United States federal government ban of the use of DDT (Guernsey). Even with this ban, the population of the bald eagles would not have been able to increase and grow without the habitat protection that was provided by the Endangered Species Act (Guernsey). Therefore, the bald eagle is another success story of the Endangered Species Act that demonstrates the effective performance of the
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