Interpretations Of Cinderella

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There have been countless versions of Cinderella, thus meaning there are many different interpretations of Cinderella. One of which, by Elizabeth Panttaja, tells the story after Cinderella’s mother died. Panttaja explains how Cinderella is only successful because of the magic that her mom is giving her, but is this true? The answer is no, since there is no evidence in her mother doing all of the work in Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm’s “Ashputtle”, another version of “Cinderella”. If fact, because of her use of magic, Cinderella is a lot weaker than many people imagine. In Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm’s “Ashputtle”, the Grimm brothers tell the story of “Ashputtle”, beginning with Ashputtle’s sick mother, and Ashputtle at bedside. Before she dies,…show more content…
Ashputtle’s new step-sisters were warm and welcome on the outside, but cold and devilish on the inside always mocking Ashputtle. Ashputtle’s father goes to the fair and promises to bring each of his daughters back a gift. While the step-sisters choose dresses and jewelry, Ashputtle asks for something different. “Break off the first branch that brushes against your hat on your way home, and bring it to me” (Grimm 629) requested Ashputtle. Her rich father kept his promise, and Ashputtle placed the hazel branch over her mother’s grave, and cried to water it. The hazel branch would soon grow into a beautiful tree, and Ashputtle would weep and prey under it three times a day. Each time that Ashputtle made a wish, a little bird would throw down what she had wished for. Later on, the king had planned a celebration where his son, the prince, would choose his bride, and invited all of the beautiful girls in the kingdom to come. Ashputtle asked her step-mother if she could go to the wedding, but she said no. So Ashputtle went to her mother’s grave, and wished for a dress. Out of nowhere, the bird that hangs around the tree tossed down a magnificent gold and…show more content…
“Each time a little white bird came and perched on the tree, and when Ashputtle (Cinderella) made a wish the little white bird threw down what she had wished for.” (Grimm 629) The real Cinderella story seems to be about the death of Cinderella’s mother, but is actually about the magic tree that Cinderella gets by visiting her mother’s grave. In the Grimm’s version the two birds are the ones bringing Cinderella the dress, not a dress magically appearing out of thin air. Is Cinderella really motherless? The Grimm’s brothers clearly show that she is, since it is animals doing all of the work. “Whereupon the little bird tossed down a gold and silver dress and slippers embroidered with silk and silver.” (Grimm 630) Never once do the authors say that the mother is the reason for the birds, or the dress. Plus her mother died at the beginning of the story, and even though Cinderella visits her mother’s grave three times a day, she is still dead. Even if Cinderella’s mother is still part of her life morally, physically she is
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