International Security: How HIV and Aids Play an Effect on That

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In the reading The Contested Concept of Security, Steve Smith implies that security is based on human security, in that there’s more to security than brute force. Traditionally, from a realist perspective, security has been defined solely as military defense. From a liberal perspective, security is not just military, but also the establishment of Institutions. However, since the events of September 11, many people like Steve Smith have been given good reason to reassess the meaning of the whole concept of security. He suggests that security needs to be defined more broadly, and that the concept of security is essentially a derivative/contested term. One of the variables that can be found when broadening the definition of security is HIV/Aids, which can lead to a breach in human security, and in turn, national security. Consequently, their will be a state collapse, which will lead us to international security, all of which I will explain in more detail later on. Traditionally, the military has been realisms approach to security. Realism is an international relations theory, which states that world politics is driven by competitive self-interest. Realists define security as military because according to Mearsheimer, the goal and objective of any great power is to achieve hegemony (A hegemon is a state that is so powerful that it dominates all other states in the system). Taking from the reading Anarchy and the Struggle for power, the reason great powers seek hegemony is because there are five realist assumptions about the international system. The first assumption is that “the international system is anarchic, which does not mean that it is chaotic or driven by disorder”. In other words, there is no one authority above all the indiv... ... middle of paper ... ...d. As you can see, even after all these efforts, the impact of HIV/AIDS adds an important international security dimension. Considering also humans rights, the United Nations will find it very difficult to deploy HIV-negative soldiers, leaving them with a shortage of armed forces, in which they need to meet their operational requirements. In conclusion, HIV/AIDS is a lethal illness killing millions every year. It can lead to a breach in human security and in turn, national security. Consequently, there will be a state collapse, which will lead us to international security. Lastly, it is in the self-interest of countries with advanced medicine infrastructures to come up with a viable and affordable AIDS vaccine, as it will eventually come back to bite them. Additionally, all the new security challenges are likely to decrease if we can take control of this pandemic.

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