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Industrial Revolution Essay

argumentative Essay
961 words
961 words
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Today we view industrial revolution as being accountable for the increased standards of living that we are enjoying. This, obviously, is true, but there is an immense and at other times atrocious price paid by human beings through suffering to achieve this standard of living. Right from the beginning, industrialization was intended to revolutionize nations’ populations from being largely rural to mainly urban. These early industrial towns created problems in areas namely; living circumstances, working circumstances and the social formation. To start with, towns built so hurriedly were built carelessly. Residences were overcrowded together all along narrow streets, poorly constructed, and incredibly crammed. For example, the population of Manchester increased as from 25,000 in 1772 to 303,000 by 1850 whereas Liverpool’s population rose 80,000 in the initial half of nineteenth century to 397,000. Entire families were organised into cellars or solitary rooms. Sanitation was practically non-existent, making fresh water a luxury held in reserve for the wealthy. Unbolted sewers ran along the streets carrying water contaminated with manufacturing and human excrement. Illnesses for example cholera, typhoid, and tuberculosis often came to pandemic proportions. Append to problems of air contamination and undernourishment and one acquires a depiction of unmatched human misery. Alcoholism, felony, prostitution, and substance abuse were natural outcomes enduring these circumstances. Away from residence, working surroundings were even shoddier. Depending on a workday, it could extend up to 19 hours daily, six out of the seven days. The job itself was hard, dull, and tedious. State of affairs around vapor engines and in mines was hot and from ti... ... middle of paper ... ...on period. In Mexico despite the increased industrialization, disparity still was on the rise. Technology change was accountable for a rise in manufacturing income inequality in the late 1980s and 1990s. In non-existence of technology, trade liberalization would have steered wage gap reduction (Das and Banerjee 159). In conclusion, the degree to which industrial progress effectively reduces poverty and inequity depends on the trend of industrialization. Industries that hire a high number of untrained workers and/or use local inputs and raw materials created with labor-intensive technology have positive effect on incomes of the poor. Taiwan use used this strategy, which positively impacted on its economy. Countries should consider industries that in the initial stages will require unskilled workers more than the skilled ones to avoid large scale inequity and poverty.

In this essay, the author

  • Opines that industrial revolution is responsible for the increased standards of living that we are enjoying, but there is an immense and atrocious price paid by human beings through suffering to achieve this standard of life.
  • Explains that early industrial towns created problems in living conditions, working circumstances, and the social formation.
  • Explains that the long queues of the jobless kept wages terribly low. occasional economic depressions led to total shut down of industries leaving thousands of jobsless.
  • Explains that industrialization is usually equated with improved education standards. however, china's remarkable economic transformation has been accompanied by certain events that debilitated children’s education.
  • Argues that mexico's industrialization policy was to some degree injurious to education growth.
  • Explains that industrialization is crucial for economic expansion and long-run poverty lessening, but it impacts on the ways the poor profit from growth.
  • Concludes that the degree to which industrial progress effectively reduces poverty and inequity depends on the trend of industrialization.
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