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Indulgences In Martin Luther's False Teachings

explanatory Essay
804 words
804 words
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→ Luther was unhappy about the way in which getting into heaven was connected with a financial transaction (indulgences) which was also not in the bible. → "Those Heretics who pretend that the laity do not need to know God's law, and that the things which priests have told them is enough, do not deserve to be listened to. For the Bible is the faith of the Church, and the more widely it becomes known the better it will be. Therefore since the laity should know the faith, it should be taught in whatever language is most easily understood." - John Wycliffe. John Wycliffe believed that the Bible was the only standard of Christian doctrine, he disagreed with indulgences and criticized the false teachings in the church. → Calvin thought there was no need for a Pope → Calvin also believed that The Church should be a democracy → Zwingli was against the selling of lives and thought that …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that luther was unhappy about the way in which getting into heaven was connected with a financial transaction (indulgences) which was also not in the bible.
  • Explains that zwingli was against the selling of lives and thought that needed to be changed just like luther fought against. he also believed in sola scriptura.
  • Explains that the council of trent was held between 1545 and 1563 in trent and bologna, northern italy.
  • Explains that the council was set up by pope paul ii as a way of responding to the reformation. their main purposes were to heal rifts between catholics and protestants, decide on the defining doctrine for the church, reform and heal the corruption and abuses within
  • Explains that the council of trent's 25th session declared authority to the church to issue indulgences and criticized "those who assert that they [indulgences] are useless"
  • Explains that the council did not agree with luther's idea of justification by faith. they decided their doctrine of merit, which allows people to redeem themselves through good deeds and through the sacraments.
  • Opines that the reformation changed the catholic church and on the church today.
  • Explains that the reformation gave the church universal principles of religious freedom, liberty of conscience, the rule of law, separation of powers, constitutionally limited republics, and the sacraments.
  • Explains that the christian church has made more of a positive impact on earth than any other religion, nation or group.

They decided their Doctrine of Merit, which allows people to redeem themselves through doing good deeds, and through the sacraments. They confirmed that Purgatory existed. They also confirmed the usefulness of prayer and indulgences in making someone's time in Purgatory shorter. They affirmed belief in transubstantiation, also the importance of all seven sacraments. They affirmed the importance of scripture as well as the teachings and traditions of the Church. After the reformation, much changed. It was people like Martin Luther who started by nailing his 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenburg. In Martin Luther’s time the Catholic Church was much more strict and had a big part in the daily lives of the people, penetrating almost every aspect of it. Luther and others such as John Calvin felt that the Church was corrupt, especially in the way of “selling” indulgences and the buying of ‘high clerical offices’. The reformation drastically changed the Catholic Church then and on the Church

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