Income Inequality Case Study

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Case 2: Income Inequality Christopher Hodges Curtis Griffie Berry Epley Campbell University BADM 742: Business Ethics July 7, 2015 “Income inequality refers to the extent to which income is distributed in an uneven manner among a population. In the United States income inequality is the gap between the rich and everyone else which has been growing markedly by every major statistical measure for approximately 30 years” (Aguiar 2013). Wealth inequality has a close relationship with income inequality due to the nature of not needing a sizeable income because of wealth that was handed down for generations. The supposed problem doesn’t originate from the slogan, “The rich is getting richer and the poorer are getting poorer”…show more content…
Yet popular measures of social stability -- crime rates, voter non-participation -- have been going down over the last couple of decades (Hargreaves, 2013). So why should we be concerned with income inequality? Income inequality has significant negative impacts to economic growth, education, healthcare and life expectancy and could even put the fairness of our political system at risk. Economic Growth…show more content…
In the early 1980s, wealthy Americans lived 2.8 years longer than the poor, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. The wealthy and poor were defined as the top and bottom 10% on a number of different economic measures. By the late 1990s the rich were living 4.5 years on longer and the gap has only widened since then (Hargreaves, 2013). A study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute examined a series of risk factors that help explain the health (or sickness) of counties in the United States. In addition to the suspects you might expect — a high smoking rate, a lot of violent crime — the researchers found that people in unequal communities were more likely to die before the age of 75 than people in more equal communities, even if the average incomes were the same (Sanger-Katz, 2015). The effect of inequality was statistically significant. The differences were small, but for every increment that a community became more unequal, the proportion of residents dying before the age of 75 went up (Sanger-Katz,
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