In Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen’s usage of letters allows the reader

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In Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen’s usage of letters allows the reader to fully comprehend the situation and certain feelings of the characters. The Usage of Jane’s Letters in Pride and Prejudice In Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen’s usage of letters allows the reader to fully comprehend the situation and certain feelings of the characters. For example, the two letters sent by Jane Bennet to Elizabeth Bennet in Chapter 46 allow the novel to arrive at a turning point in many different aspects. The obvious purpose of the written letters is to inform the reader of the events at hand regarding Lydia Bennet and Mr. Wickham. However, these letters allow changes to take place in other relationships as well. Jane Bennet illustrates herself much in the letters that she composes. She is constantly optimistic and trusts people immensely, shown in the lines “But I am willing to hope the best, and that his character has been misunderstood.” Jane is constantly considering the feelings of other people and she conveys that she does not like to impose on others. She states in the second letter, “Now as the first shock is over, shall I own that I long for your return? I am not so selfish, however, as to press for it, if inconvenient.” Even in her opening statement in the first distressed letter Jane states, “I am afraid of alarming you-be assured that we are all well.” These statements easily show her compassion and consideration for others. When describing the state of the rest of the family because of Lydia’s actions, Jane precedes each of their names with the word “poor.” For example, she writes “my poor mother is really ill and keeps to her room,” and “Poor Kitty has anger for having concealed their attachmen... ... middle of paper ... ...y because of the incorrect address is vital in conveying Jane’s emotions to the reader. It is apparent that Jane Austen intended these two solitary letters to play a vital role in the novel. These letters single-handedly brought on the climax of the novel and allowed many different relationships to develop. If the letters were not available to the reader or even simply mentioned, the novel would be lacking in a connection with the reader. These letters convey emotions and worries that otherwise might not be discussed in person, such as the negative comments about Mr. Wickham and his supposed intentions for Lydia Bennet. The letters also allow the reader to personally imitate the internal reactions of the original receiver in the novel. Jane Bennet’s two letters to Elizabeth certainly fulfill these literary functions and are quite essential to the novel.

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