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In Praise Of Sweatshops

analytical Essay
1173 words
1173 words
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Sweatshops are an unfortunate part of our global economy. The workers are paid extremely low wages, receive little to no benefits (such as health insurance, sick leave, etc.), and more often than not work under difficult or dangerous conditions. The benefits of sweatshops (if any) is a hot-button issue in today’s society. Sweatshops do not treat their workers well (as mentioned above), yet at the same time, they bring jobs that help many people escape the horrors of extreme poverty. This issue begs the question: are sweatshops improving lives? Or are they another form of abuse?
In an article written by Alex Massie, titled "In Praise of Sweatshops"; he speaks about the many suggestions people have given on how to improve the situations in sweatshops. In his article, Alex writes, “Some even suggest that factories in Bangladesh and other developing countries be held to the same standards that apply to factories and working conditions in countries such as the United States or the United Kingdom. Intuitively, this seems an appealing argument. But it is, nevertheless, an inadequate one.” (Massie, “In Praise of Sweatshops”). In many developing countries; they lack the funds to implement change and improve standards, …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Opines that sweatshops are an unfortunate part of our global economy. they provide jobs that help many people escape the horrors of extreme poverty.
  • Analyzes alex massie's article titled "in praise of sweatshops" about the suggestions people have given on how to improve the situations in sweatshop.
  • Opines that it would be better if more buildings in bangladesh met existing, local, safety regulations than trying to hold them to the standards of more developed countries.
  • Explains that sweatshops have positive outcomes, such as jobs, growing economy, and empowerment. many people in bangladesh are "toiling in the fields."
  • Analyzes how bangladesh's economy is growing slowly each year, but the minimum wages paid to garment workers are still low by our standards. capitalization pays a heavy price for the bangladeshi.
  • Analyzes how alex's article touches on something paul krugman suggested in which he suggests increased competition and higher wages actually drives standards up, not down.
  • Analyzes how nicholas kristof describes life in a garbage dump in phnom penh, cambodia, in his article "where sweatshops are a dream".
  • Analyzes how nicholas explains that the central challenge in the poorest countries is not that sweatshops exploit too many people, but that they don't exploit enough.
  • Opines that sweatshops are improving the lives of people in developing countries by giving them jobs, stimulating their economy, raising them from the depths of extreme poverty, and providing them a safer alternative than wandering around in garbage dumps.
  • Opines that sweatshops are a form of abuse and exploitation. companies in developed countries outsource their work to people working in them and pay them almost nothing.
  • Concludes that sweatshops are improving the lives of people in developing countries, but they are also a form of abuse and exploitation.

Whether or not this is actually true is up for speculation. Delving more into the positives of sweatshops, the article talks about how westerners benefit from sweatshops. The article describes how not only do the big businesses benefit from sweatshops but how our own poor do as well. Many of our poor have to make tough decisions every day, and most if not all of them have very limited funds. For those with said limited funds, they must choose to manage their funds carefully. With clothing as another necessity, cheaply made clothes produced in sweatshops are a benefit to

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