Importance of Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange

1088 Words5 Pages
In the novel Wuthering Heights, a story about love that has turned into obsession, Emily Bronte manipulates the desolate setting and dynamic characters to examine the self-destructive pain of compulsion. Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights is a novel about lives that are intertwined with one another. All the characters in this novel are commingled in their relationships with Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange.

The setting used throughout the novel Wuthering Heights helps to set the mood to describe the characters. We find two households separated by the cold, muddy, and barren moors, one by the name of Wuthering Heights, and the other by the name of Thrushcross Grange. Each house stands alone, in the mist of the dreary land, and the atmosphere creates a mood of isolation. In the novel, there are two places where virtually all of the action takes place. These two places, Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange, differ greatly from each other in appearance and mood. These differences reflect the universal conflict between storm and calm that Emily Bronte develops as the theme in her novel Wuthering Heights.

Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange both represent several opposing properties. The inhabitants of Wuthering Heights were that of the working class, while those of Thrushcross Grange were higher on the social ladder. The people of Wuthering Heights aspired to be on the same level as the Lintons. This is evident when Heathcliff and Catherine peek through their window. In addition, Wuthering Heights is always in a state of storminess while Thrushcross Grange always seemed calm. Wuthering Heights and its surroundings depict the cold, dark, and evil side of life.

Wuthering Heights is parallel to the life ...

... middle of paper ...

..., emotional power, figures of speech, and handling of dialect that make the characters of Wuthering Heights relate so closely with their surroundings. The contrast of these two houses adds much to the meaning of this novel, and without it, the story would not be the interesting, complex novel it is. The contrast between the houses is more than physical, rather these two houses represent the opposing forces which are embodied in their inhabitants. Having this contrast is what brings about the presentation of this story altogether. Bronte made Heathcliff and Wuthering Height as one. Both of these are cold, dark, and menacing, similar to a storm. Thrushcross Grange with the Lintons was more of a welcoming and peaceful dwelling. The personality of both is warm and draws itself to you by the warmth of the decor and richness of the surrounding landscape.
Open Document