Importance Of Resilience In Human Development

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Resiliency, first, protects development through the utilization of promotive and protective factors. Masten, Herbers, Cutuli, & Reed (2009) asserts that protective factors act as moderators between risk factors and outcome. These factors are multidimensional and multifaceted, and by acting together as a system, create the resiliency response. These processes operate at different levels and in different ways throughout development (Masten, Herbers, Cutuli, & Lafavor, 2008). Common factors found among resilient individuals include positive contextual, social, and individual qualities (Zimmerman). A summative, but not exclusive, list of these factors include include self-efficacy and competence, supportive familial relationships, personality,…show more content…
Early secure attachments work as a regulatory function for infants and young children, and provide a safe, secure base. Sensitive, secure care-givers are able to emulate emotional and behavior regulation, and help to moderate stress in children. A secure base is important throughout lifespan development, but especially when faced with risks and hardship. This role often shifts from caregiver to close friends, or to perhaps a romantic partner. When experiencing a risk or tragedy, people reach out to their secure base which provides comfort and relieves stress, which is a resilient response. The lack or loss of a secure base can result in great anxiety, fear, and increased stress (Masten & Obradović,…show more content…
Like the definition of resilience, and the process of resilience itself, the manifestation of resilience is multidimensional and complex. A simple response is that resilience is a favorable or good outcome, despite serious threats to adaptation and development (Windle, 2011). This may mean happiness, physical health, emotional wellbeing, and life satisfaction (Lavafor, 2008). But, more often, it is ability to continue to function, despite obstacles. To adapt both internally and externally to and show competency in the self and one's environment in a developmentally appropriate way (Masten, Herbers, Cutuli, & Reed, 2009; Lafavor, 2008). Windle (2011) states that resilience is not the absence of distress because risks and stressors are a part of development. So rather, the maintenance of competence during and despite distress is one of the strongest forms of
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