Importance Of Leadership Theories In Educational Leadership

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Understanding multiple leadership methodologies is critical when facing the surfeit of problems that emerge when managing the diverse population found in higher education (Nworie, 2012; Wang & Berger, 2010). In order to understand and apply leadership methodologies effectively, leadership cannot be studied in a singular context, but must be explored in complex settings and using methodologies that fit the needs of the situation, the organization, and the people involved (Bass, 2008). To demonstrate knowledge of leadership theories and knowledge of how those theories are applied in different context, the discussion is divided into two parts. The first portion will discuss 4 theories in educational leadership, provide examples of how each theory…show more content…
Transformational leaders lead by example through personal charisma and demonstration of the behaviors, such as determination, honesty, integrity, ethical behavior, caring, and hard work they wish to see to motivate others to adopt the new vision (McCleskey, 2014; Moman Basham, 2012b; Nworie, 2012). Transformational leaders are able to inspire their followers to not only follow their vision, but to be intrinsically motivated to want to go above and beyond expectations to achieve more than expected (Butcher et al., 2011; McCleskey, 2014; Moman Basham, 2012b; Nworie, 2012). There are four characteristics of transformational leaders, which are idealized influence, individual consideration, intellectual stimulation, and inspirational motivation (Bass, 2008; McCleskey, 2014; Moman Basham, 2012b). Idealized influence, briefly addressed above, is the behavior demonstrated to influence the behavior desired from the faculty and staff, such as high moral standards, desire to succeed, and empathy for others by the leader. Individual consideration refers to how the leader considers the needs of each employee in the organization and works as their coach or mentor…show more content…
In higher education, this would mean the administrator puts the needs of the faculty, staff, and students above a personal agenda of greater power and achievement to meet the needs of the followers (Bass, 2008). Servant leadership is designed around a commitment and desire to serve others, which is demonstrated by receiving the feedback of others, applying that feedback to provide better service, and through a self-sacrificing, cooperative nature (Burch et al., 2015; Northouse, 2010; Stoten, 2013). Additionally, according to Stoten (2013), instead disseminating the administrator’s vision to the faculty and staff through personal charisma as seen in transformational leadership, with servant leadership the administrator takes on a supportive and nurturing role by adopting and helping to disseminate the ideas of the faculty. An example of servant leadership in higher education is with customer service provided cross-departmentally at WGU. Debbie Fowler, the Assistant Provost for Assessment at WGU, demonstrates a servant leadership style in all forms of cross-departmental communication and encourages others to follow this method. She responds to all questions and concerns expediently and demonstrates the highest
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