Impact Of Social Darwinism

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Social Darwinism and Its Impact in America One concept that has played a significant role in American history involves Social Darwinism, as it has affected topics from helping the immigrants and the poor to mandated sterilization. While one may think Social Darwinism and Evolutionary Darwinism are the same concepts, they are quite different, though Social Darwinism does draw some of its fundamental points from Evolutionary Darwinism. For instance, Social Darwinism adopted the principle of “survival of the fittest”; however, it applied this concept not to the evolution of man, but to racial superiority and inferiority, especially regarding the mentally disabled, criminals, and disadvantaged (Dennis, 1995). It is crucial to note, though, that…show more content…
According to this view, these less-fortunate offspring’s elimination, modification, and extinction brings about progress in the society (Wells, 1907). Weeding out the weak and feeble betters the society as a whole and establishes a supremacy for races, classes, and nations (Wells, 1907). In essence, this view promotes the idea that a specific group of people (particularly the rich and powerful) is selectively chosen to rule and populate the society, and all the poor, immigrants, and disabled interfere with their destiny. These ideas were primarily influential in how the United States treated the immigrants that came to the nation from 1870 to…show more content…
Fundamentalist Christians believed that God created man in His own image, and that claiming mankind was simply an evolved animal was a direct assault on the Bible (Numbers, 1992). Furthermore, Fundamentalist Christians opposed Social Darwinism, and they established the Social Gospel movement, which attempted to create societal reform and alleviate some of the problems stemming from the Industrial Revolution (Schultz, 2016). This stood in direct contrast with Social Darwinism, as the Social Gospel movement tried to help those who were in need, as well as reduce poverty and prostitution (Schultz, 2016). Additionally, the Fundamentalist Christians opposed eugenics, as they believed that only God should determine who is and who is not fit to
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