Impact Of Religious Pluralism

2221 Words9 Pages
Religious pluralism is an attitude towards the diversity of religions. It can be understood as the manyness of religions, where there is a "free existence of many faiths"(Albanese 2013:11), the idea that different religious systems can co-exist in a society together. To certain groups of people, religious pluralism is an obstacle for religious development as it can cause the lost of distinctiveness and challenge the 'one true way '; while other groups welcome religious pluralism as a means to religious freedom, where everyone can practice own religion without being judged. Throughout American history, especially when comparing the periods prior and after the World 's Fair in 1893, the progress for religious pluralism is too much and not enough.…show more content…
A custom of a society doomed to be destroyed, if not already so. For the Native Americans, achieving religious freedom has been elusive. From the federal government 's bans on the Native Americans ' traditional ceremonial practices during the nineteenth century to the legal battles over Indian sacred lands during the twenty-first century, the United States has often acted as if the indigenous traditions of the continent were not truly religious, therefore not eligible for the constitutional protections of the First Amendment (Wenger 2009:xiii). The federal government 's attitudes against the Native American was obvious and can also be seen during the Worlds Columbian Exposition, as they refused to invite Native Americans ' representative. The United States Secretary of the Interior Hubert Work argued that the "ordinances" of "Indian religion" must be modified "into harmony with the forms of the Christian religion which civilization has approved, from which out rules of life are drafted and upon which our Government is founded "(Wenger 2009:174). America was not tolerant of religions other than Christianity. Agitated by the alarming circumstance, Native Americans realized their culture being endangered and their freedom of religious practices being constrained. With reference to their previous success, they attempted to disguise…show more content…
Sociologist Levy-Bruhl, although did not directly, commented that they disliked reasoning and did not adopt logic (Levy-Bruhl 1923). In an attempt to understand something they can 't visualize or explain, they classified it as witchcraft (Levy-Bruhl 1923). To those who used the lens of salvage ethnography to study Native Americans, they were primitive because they were not industrialized. These thoughts put them at a disadvantage; they were seen as a relic of a pre-modern society, yet they were said to have a beautiful history that needed to be remembered. Despite having real Natives living in America, they were presented as little dolls in the context of a natural history museum (Capriccioso 2009); these false representations were deeply embodied in the society, the perceived primitiveness set limits to their religious status; and there is a lack of representation of the "primitive" at the World 's Parliament of Religions (Burris
Open Document