preview

Imagination And Imagination Essay

Good Essays
Imagination and Senses
Albert Einstein said, “The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.” A strong imagination can make all things possible and cause supernatural events that could never have seemed possible. Imagination and strong senses are characteristics of romanticism stories or poems that are shown in “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe and “Abraham’s Boys” by Joe Hill.
Imagination is shown in “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe. The raven in the story represents never ending sadness. Throughout the whole poem the raven repeats only one word to show the hopelessness of the narrator:
“Quoth the Raven ‘nevermore’” (“The Raven” 84). When the raven in the poem speaks it shows a supernatural event and rejects rational and factual
…show more content…
When he says that it is December the reader pictures a cold dark night and the mention of embers forces the reader to picture a dying fire and a dark room.
Anderson 3
In “Abraham’s Boys” by Joe Hill, imagination is used to make the story unpredictable. In the story Max Van Helsing's father is paranoid about vampires following their family around. He says, “You know our enemies?
And still you dally with your friends until the night come”(“Abraham's Boys pg 94). Mr. Van Helsing’s irrational fear of vampires, which are imaginary creatures, represents imagination because of the dispelling of rational thoughts for a more fantastical way of thinking. Another example of imagination in the story is when Mr. Van Helsing takes the boys down to the basement and shows them what he actually does for a career. He teaches
Rudy and Max how to kill a vampire and explains to them how a vampire will react when they are killed. When Rudy refuses to do his part in removing the head of the vampire his dad overreacts and tries to force Rudy to do it. Max tries to help rudy by offering to do it instead, his father won’t let him
…show more content…
Strong senses are also shown in the story Abraham’s Boys. When
Rudy and Max enter their father’s study and Rudy discovers hints toward their father’s profession it appeals to almost all of their senses: “his attention was caught by a picture frame, slid halfway in under his father’s armchair. It was facedown, but he knew what he’d see when he turned it over. It was a
Anderson 4 sepia toned calotype print of his mother, posed in the library of their townhouse in Amsterdam. She wore a white straw hat, her ebon hair fluffed in airy curls beneath it. One gloved hand was raised in an enigmatic gesture, so that she almost appeared to be waving an invisible cigarette in the air.
Her lips were parted. She was saying something, Max often wondered what”
(“Abraham’s Boys” pgs 101-102). This very vivid description makes the reader feel like they are their looking at the picture and can feel the urgency of the situation. In this part of the story the boys climbed into their fathers study and caused a huge mess that needed to be picked up or their father would know they were in there. Another example of strong senses is
Get Access