I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud by William Wordsworth

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I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud by William Wordsworth “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth, a poem that discloses the relationship between nature and human beings: how nature can affect one’s emotion and behavior with its motion and sound. The words the author adopted in this poem are interconnected and related to each other. They are simple yet profound, letting us understand how much William Wordsworth related his works to nature and the universe. It also explained to us why William Wordsworth is one of the greatest and the most influential English romantic poets in history. As Robert DiYanni says in his book, “with much of Wordsworth’s poetry, this lyric reflects his deep love of nature, his vision of a unified world, and his celebration of the power of memory and imagination.” In “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” William Wordsworth uses various natural phenomena, such as clouds, daffodils and waves, as devices to characterize his speaker’s different stages of emotion and feeling. The first few lines of the poem showed us the speaker’s initial emotion. His mind is directionless, but also alienated and isolated in the universe. “I wandered lonely as a cloud, that floats on high o’er vales and hills,” the speaker is described as a “cloud,” lonely, aimless, and cruising quickly and lightly through “vales” and “hills.” A vision of the daffodils moved him to a state of being connected to something, as the poet wrote, “When all at once I saw a crowd, a host, of golden daffodils.” The concord and harmony of the “dancing daffodils” replaced his feeling of loneliness; he is no longer a “lonely cloud.” As the twinkling stars in the milky way, and the sparkling dancing waves appeared in the second stanz... ... middle of paper ... ... Lonely as a Cloud” is a masterpiece of work from William Wordsworth. He implicated nature with human actions and feelings, bringing the daffodils, the waves and other aspects of nature to life. “The emphasis on the happiness of the daffodils and their large number serves to point up sharply the isolation and dispiritedness of the speaker,” as Robert DiYanni quoted. The various words together with the other elements that William Wordsworth constructed in the poem not only reflected joy, but also nature’s harmony with human beings and their coexistence on earth. Bibliography: DiYanni, Robert. Literature: Reading fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Compact Ed. The United States of America. McGraw-Hill. 2000. P.1444 DiYanni, Robert. Literature: Reading fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Compact Ed. The United States of America. McGraw-Hill. 2000. P.424
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