Human Trafficking In Canada Essay

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Human trafficking is “Modern Day Slavery,” in Canada today. From April 2007 to December 2013, there were 50 cases where human traffickers were found guilty, and from those cases, 97 people were convicted of human trafficking offenses. The Ontario Women’s Justice Network (OWJN) defines human trafficking as the recruitment and control of individuals that are exploited and taken advantage of against their will, (OWJN, p. 1- 2). There are various forms of human trafficking in Canada and the victims are vulnerable in all classes, genders, ages, and industries, but research needs to improve to validate concrete statistics. However, there are many Canadian sex workers that do object to the regulation of their chosen profession of prostitution…show more content…
The research community has been given the opportunity to make a practical assessment of the trafficking phenomenon in Canada to include the characteristics of victims and traffickers, trafficking trajectories, and the services needed to support and protect victims. Unfortunately, these opportunities for collecting data have not been embraced, and there has been very little research on trafficking in human beings in Canada, (Laczko, Godzdziak, 2005, p. 99). A complaint for more data from the Strategic Planning and Policy Unit of Counseling and Audit Canada developed an Inventory of Information Needs and Available Information in Women…show more content…
They were also one of the first nations to sign (December 2000) and ratify (May 2002) the Protocols. On the home front, an arranged Independent Working Group coordinated with the Canadian Federal Government reguarding trafficking. In the aftermath of 911, IWG members did not know the ins and outs of trafficking, therefore, a security lens was useful in getting human trafficking onto the public agenda, and members feel this issue should be part of the public framework,(Oxman-Martinez, et al. ,2005,). The Federal Minister of Justice formalized the role of the IWG in the spring of 2004. They received an official mandate to cultivate a comprehensive anti-trafficking policy. According to Oxman=Martinez (2005), anti-trafficking energies in Canada have focused on prosecution of traffickers and interception of irregular migrants; their opinions are that Canada still does not have legal direction for the protection of victims, (Laczko, Godzdziak, 2005, p.102). Another criticism from a 2000 study by the consulting and audit Canada, there is no agreed-upon definition of trafficking in persons, amid the individual member departments of the
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