Human Behavior: Nature vs. Nurture

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Scientists and biologist have argued the Nature versus Nurture debate for decades. This debate is about the degree to which our environment and heredity, affects our behavior and developmental stages. According to this debate, nature can be described as, the behavior of a person is occurring because of their genetic makeup. Since the behavior of a person is due to their genetic makeup, then, it (nature) should also influence a person’s growth and development for the duration of their life. However, the nurture side of the debate says, the cause for an individual’s behavior is because of environmental factors. This would mean that the influence from our family (immediate and extended), friends and other individuals would mold our behavior. Ultimately, no one knows if nature or nurture affects behavior more; or if it is a combination of both nature and nurture dictating an individual’s behavior; or if neither nature nor nurture affects a person’s behavior. This paper will examine the nature versus nurture debate through the topics of violence, intelligence and economics, and sports.
When looking at the issue of violence, violence is a natural abnormality that should be rehabilitated; violence can also be a learned behavior that children of all ages should be informed to avoid. Before I continue to make assumptions about violence, violence should be viewed through, genetic makeup causing an individual(s) to behavior a certain way, how the environment would affect the behavior of an individual(s), and how both genetics and environmental factors merge together to create violent behaviors. Before there is an understanding of how serotonin effects violent outburst, we must first understand and breakdown the science of serotonin. Serotoni...

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