How the Federal Bilingual Education Act of 1968 Ended the War on Poverty

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The purpose of this paper is to examine how the Federal Bilingual Education Act of 1968, ended the War on Poverty. Bilingual education is the use of more than one language to deliver curriculum content. The bilingual education system is designed for students to become proficient in English, and also encourage students to become bi-cultural; and function in two, or more linguistic and cultural groups. The policy expressed U.S commitment to the needs of the growing number of children in the public schools, whose first language was not English. In 1968, the government passed the Bilingual Education Act, which required language minority students to be taught in both their native language and English. I myself had to undergo English as a second language classes in middle school; German being my first language, I did not learn English until I was twelve. Children today face an ever increasingly diversified and multicultural world. Where broadband horizon and education are necessary, an effective way to ensure children's future success will be to incorporate bilingual learning into everyday curriculum through immersion, transition, pullout, and maintenance programs in public schools. Teachers in the 1960s were viewed as “capable professionals,” because they implemented creative lessons, individualized instruction, and had a flexible class schedule (Parkay, 2013). It was not until the administration of President Lyndon B. Johnson, who saw education as the key to ending poverty, and started sponsoring the War on Poverty Act. Which developed a program providing subsidized breakfast, and lunches for students in need. Without the aid of these programs some students who are being raised by a single parent could not afford the day to day exp... ... middle of paper ... ...earners. If people were bilingual, they could compete with jobs internationally and rebuild the job market for people who do not speak two languages. Another reason to know two languages is that in today’s society science and technology are almost all terms and versions are in English. “Culture is embedded in the language,” it is a fact that some people agree on and try to preserve (Parkay, 2013). Bilingual education is focused on trying to maintain the student’s ethnic identity, but also become proficient in both languages through either immersion, transition, pullout, or maintenance programs. Incorporating bilingual learning into everyday curriculum through immersion, transition, pullout, or maintenance programs, will only strengthen our community, city, state, and our country. With each student, we are able to teach English we add to our community.

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