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How is Scrooge presented in a Christmas Carol

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How is Scrooge presented in a Christmas Carol - What is he like? Are

we sympathetic to him? Does he change? What language features are used

to do this?

Ebenezer Scrooge

This essay is looking at the character, Ebenezer Scrooge throughout

the play. It looks at the person he is and the person he becomes. It

also looks at the language Dickens uses to portray Mr Scrooge.

Dickens portrays Scrooge as a ' tight fisted, penny pincher' with

alliterations and metaphors such as, 'wrenching, grasping, scraping,

clutching, covetous old sinner' emphasising his meanness. He seems a

mean old man with no time for the festivities of Christmas, nor any

other special day at that! Even when the cheerful voice of his nephew

rings out to wish him a very Merry Christmas, his reply was ' Bah,

Humbug!' He snubs visitors with the frost of his nature and speaks

with a voice that begrudges their happiness and united joy. He is even

bitter to the clerk, Bob Cratchit for having a paid day off, stating

' A poor excuse for picking a man's pocket every twenty - fifth of

December! ' (Stave 1)

When the ghost of Marley appears, Scrooge tries to jest with him to

distract his fears but the spectre voice 'disturbs the very marrow in

his bones.' He begs for mercy and asks why the 'dreadful apparition is

troubling him' Although mean and nasty, the reader sees here that

Scrooge is also a coward! Jacob Marley tells of the chains that were

forged in life and what is waiting for Scrooge, telling him

'I am here tonight to warn you, that you have a chance and hope of

escaping my fate' (Stave 1)

If Scrooge did not change his mean old ways, then he is only to look

forward to an after life like poor Jacob. To Scrooge's disappointment

and di...

... middle of paper ...

...tion of the word 'and'

quickens the pace, and indicates the excitement felt by Scrooge.

Scrooge remembers all that was shown to him and he sets off to alter

the future, which only evoked doom. He buys an overwhelmingly large

turkey for Bob Cratchit, attends his Nephews party and generally

spreads the good will and festive cheer of Christmas! Scrooge keeps

his promise, and everyone benefits. There is a repetition of the word

good

' He became a good friend, a good master, and as good a man, as the

good old city knew, or any other good old city, town or borough, in

the good Old World' (Stave 5)

This proves that he has genuinely changed for the better of himself

and everyone around him. The moral of the story is, as Dickens surely

tried to put across, that it is never too late to alter your ways, and

if you don't change, things could happen to you too.
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